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Can You magnetize water?

  1. Oct 25, 2004 #1
    i know you can ionize water to make it magnetic, but some people claim if you put a glass of normal water on a magnet (so the water is in a magnetic field) it will become magnetized in a few minutes.

    my guess would be that water particles are too free to become magnetically aligned, and so it won't work.

    what do you people know?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 25, 2004 #2

    russ_watters

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    Since water molecules are lopsided, they are magnetic. When water freezes, they line up according to their magnetic poles. I guess holding a magnet to a glass of water would line the molecules up a little, but it wouldn't be permanent.
     
  4. Oct 25, 2004 #3

    Mk

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    Paramagnetic? I've never seen water as doing this before.
     
  5. Oct 26, 2004 #4
    There are flow meters that use this electromagnetic principal of liquids. I looked into making a knot meter for boats using this. It works but the cost is too high compared with other methods.
     
  6. Oct 26, 2004 #5

    Chi Meson

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    You can create a net magnetic field by having any charged substance move in a direction. If you ionized water and caused ot to swirl in a circle, then you would have moving charges and hence a magnetic dipole field.

    As already noted by Russ, water is already "magnetic", but the magnetic dipole moments of the water molecule are very small.

    Russ:
    here's a point I can't remember: is water diamagnetic or paramagnetic? Mk said "para" but I thought it was "dia."

    edit:
    OK, I looked it up, water is "diamagnetic," buyt doesn't that mean the natural dipole moment of water should be zero? It's been too long!
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2004
  7. Oct 27, 2004 #6

    Mk

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    Ahh, yes, I was asking a question actually.
     
  8. Oct 27, 2004 #7

    russ_watters

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    Chemistry ain't my thing guys, and when you start using those big words, I need to Google them too... But I'll take a stab at it: water is a liquid and therefore, (I think) only diamagnetic at a molecular level (hydrogen bonds) - as opposed to a metal rod that can be magnetized as a whole.
     
  9. Oct 27, 2004 #8

    Chi Meson

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    Yeh, it's not exactly life-changing is it? My anxiety grows proportionally to the mound of things I've forgotten.
     
  10. Oct 28, 2004 #9

    Mk

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    Heh, me too.

    I guess you must be happy, Red Sox won. :biggrin:
     
  11. Oct 28, 2004 #10
  12. Oct 28, 2004 #11

    Chi Meson

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  13. Oct 28, 2004 #12

    Gokul43201

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    You can not "magnetize" a para- or dia-magnet as their B-H curves are not hysteretic. To magnetize something, you want to have a a residual magnetization in the absence of a applied field. This can be an energy minimizing state only if there is an energy associated with some mechanism such as domain wall breaking (ie: in a ferro-magnet).
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2004
  14. Oct 28, 2004 #13

    Chi Meson

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    Right! I was just about to say that! :uhh:
     
  15. Jan 18, 2009 #14
    Look, i am a 12 year-old boy, and i need help with my homework. I need you to tell me the steps to magnetize water, i have to make a project for a science fair
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2009
  16. Jan 19, 2009 #15
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