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Can you name this composition?

  1. Mar 12, 2012 #1
    Hi everybody :smile: my first post here and I wonder can you recognize and name this two alloys?
    first:
    Ni27.5%
    Fe63%
    Cr5.5%

    second

    Ni60%
    Fe25%
    Mo2%
    Cu3.3%
    Mn1%
    Cr5.5%

    It looks like some soft magnetic alloys but ... :frown:
    Cheers
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2012 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF.

    What is the context of your question? Is this for schoolwork?
     
  4. Mar 12, 2012 #3
    Thanks. Nope, I'm not a student, I'm looking for some expert help for my project. Hope that's OK.
     
  5. Mar 12, 2012 #4

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    What kind of project? What is the remaining material in each alloy? (the percentages do not add up to 100%)
     
  6. Mar 12, 2012 #5
    Electromagnetic shield. I need this composition for broken part replacement. Unfortunately I don't know exact chemical composition, I'm looking for close "modern" material since this shield was made long time ago. I know that it's possible to substitute this composition with superior materials like mumetal but it will be nice to find "historical correct" one. At last, mumetal is my last solution.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2012 #6

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Interesting problem. Do you mean "electromagnetic" or "magnetic" shield? There is a difference.

    If it is magnetic shield, the mu-metal netic+conetic shielding is your best bet. You can get lots of info and custom shield quotes from here:

    http://www.magnetic-shield.com/

    I've used them for several projects, and found their customer support to be very good. You can get kits to bend up your own custom shields, but as you know, you will need to get them annealed after you bend them or they lose most of their effectiveness.

    If the alloy mixes you show are from analysis of the materials of the old existing shields, it may be difficult to reproduce the original recipe. Often the mixes and processing are proprietary to the company that made the shields in the first place.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2012 #7
    Yes, my typo, magnetic shield. Yes, I'm familiar with mumetal and it's properties, problem is that "original" alloy has different resistivity . Unfortunately in this application it really matters. It seems that this alloy is really unknown :frown:
     
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