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Cant stand the heat?

  1. May 13, 2008 #1
    Cant stand the heat???

    This is my experiment i had to do!!!!!!!!!

    In this lab you will investigate the properties of gases as they relate to temperature and pressure.
    Materials
    one empty soda can
    tongs
    water
    one 2- to 3- quart saucepan
    Caution: This lab involves heat and the can will be very hot. Please have a parent or guardian present while doing the experiment. Follow the safety procedure outlined in your safety contract.
    You must use metal tongs for this experiment. The kind you use for an outside grill work well. Do not use any kind of mitt or glove to pick up the can. This is so the can is well away from your hand when you put it in the water. If you are unsure what tongs are, or do not understand in any way, stop, and contact your instructor.
    Procedure
    Read over all the instructions before beginning.
    Fill the sauce pan with tap water. Set it close to the stove.
    Place about 2 tablespoons of water into the empty can.
    Heat the can on the stove until the water inside boils. This will not take long. You will see water vapor coming out of the top of the can when it is boiling.
    Now get ready for a surprise!
    Pick up the can with the tongs, immediately turn it upside down, then place the can in the water and pan.


    Analysis
    Analysis

    Hint: As you are thinking about this we want you to know that the water in the can and in the pan is only there to heat or cool the air in the can. In 5.07 you studied the relationships of temperature and pressure as it affects volume. Use this knowledge in explaining your results. Also, don't forget about atmospheric pressure!

    Before you begin the analysis think about what was actually happening to the gases inside versus outside the can. Think in terms of where the pressure is greatest, versus less.
    What happened when you put the can in the water?
    Why did this happen? Make sure you relate why this happened to the changes in pressure inside and outside the can.
    Why did you have to turn the can upside down? (Try the experiment again without turning the can over when you put it in the water.)
    What gas law would account for what happened?
    Explain how your choice of this gas law is supported by your observations.



    Here is what i have so far...
    1. What happened when you put the can in the water?
    The can imploded and made a “popping” noise.

    2. Why did this happen?
    This happened because when the temperature in the can decreased, the volume in the can decreased as well. This made the pressure inside the can decrease. The result was the pressure inside the can was lower than the pressure outside of it. The atmospheric pressure made the can implode and pushed the sides of the can together.

    3. Why did you have to turn the can upside down?
    I think the can was turned upside down so that air would not get into the can really fast. This prevents it from increasing the decrease in the air volume inside the can.

    4. What gas law would account for what happened?
    The law that would account for what happened would be Boyle's Law.

    5. Explain how your choice of this gas law is supported by your observations.

    ?????????????????????????????????????? i dont get # 5


    CAN SOMEONE PLEASEEEEEEEE CHECK MY WORK/ HELP ME WITH #5??? THANKSSS
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 13, 2008 #2

    cristo

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    You need to show some work for part 5 before we can help. What do you think?
     
  4. May 13, 2008 #3
    well boyle's law states that under conditions of constant temperature and quantity, there is an inverse relationship between the volume and pressure for an ideal gas. but im not sure how to explain that in like a question format?
     
  5. May 13, 2008 #4

    Hootenanny

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    Pretty colours...
     
  6. May 13, 2008 #5

    Redbelly98

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    Is the temperature really kept constant in this experiment?

    The problem with using someone else's answers is that, if they're wrong, then it's obvious that you're using someone else's answers.

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=151284
     
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