1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Capacator with moving dielectric

  1. Mar 9, 2005 #1
    suppose you had a capacator and a free to move dialetric, which was outside of it, and you attatch a voltage to the capacator. the dialetric will move in. however, does anybody know what force and where the force is that causes the dialetric to move in?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2005 #2

    Andrew Mason

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    The dielectric contains polar molecules, that is molecules which have a + and a - side. So they align with the electric field (e.g. + side of molecule toward - plate). This means the dielectric experiences a force toward the plates. The force depends on the number and degree of polarity of the molecules in the dielectric, which determines the k of the permitivity.

    AM
     
  4. Mar 9, 2005 #3
    thanks. by the way, would it be the fringing effects of the electric fields that cause the force? (as the non fringing electric field would be pointing in the direction of one plate to another)
     
  5. Mar 9, 2005 #4

    Andrew Mason

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    No. The molecules in the dielectric are affected by the entire field of the plate. Have a look at this, for example:

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html

    AM
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Capacator with moving dielectric
  1. Heat capacity (Replies: 3)

  2. Capacity numerical (Replies: 2)

  3. Heat capacity (Replies: 16)

  4. Capacity of a Barge (Replies: 5)

Loading...