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Capacitive Sensing

  1. Mar 27, 2013 #1
    Hi All,

    I've been recently reading up on capacitive sensing. Specifically, the case where you have one sensor which is an electrode with a static electric field. When this electrode comes near a conductive target (which is floating and not part of the circuit), the change in potential of the initial electrode can be detected and thus a proximity sensor can be made.

    What I am trying to figure out, is if more conductive liquids/materials, result in a larger change of potential and/or capacitance. In other words, will a capacitive sensor work better if the liquid it is trying to detect is more conductive? If so, why?


    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
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