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Capacitor (the dissipation of electrical energy)

  1. Nov 9, 2004 #1
    An L-R-C series circuit with an inductance of 0.116 , a resistance of 235 , and a capacitance of 7.25 carries an rms current of 0.453 with a frequency of 393 .

    The phase angle is .776radians.
    The power factor is .714
    The impedance is 329ohms
    The rms voltage is 149V
    The average power is 48.2
    The average rate at which electrical energy is converted to thermal energy in the resistor is 48.2W.

    I need to figure out what the average rate at which electrical energy is dissipated (converted to other forms) in the capacitor?

    and What is the average rate at which electrical energy is dissipated (converted to other forms) in the inductor?

    Any help is GREAT!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 10, 2004 #2
    The answer is 0 for both parts
     
  4. Nov 15, 2004 #3
    This is an example of a common "trick" question that I've encountered on some electronics exams (like the one I took back in 1970 for my FCC license)...they give you voltages, frequency, component values, etc, then ask for the power dissipated in a capacitor (or inductor). The answer is simple: ZERO. Reactance stores energy, but does not dissipate it.
     
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