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Carbon Dioxide in Water

  1. Feb 16, 2009 #1
    In the reaction of carbon dioxide and water to form carbonic acid, does water act as a lewis base because it donates a pair of electrons to carbon dioxide or does carbon dioxide act as a Bronsted-Lowry base because it accepts a proton from water?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2009 #2
    if the generic equation looks like this after its balanced, then its a bronsted lowry

    (its balanced 1:1) and it makes a substance and something else, usually with OH or H3O+

    if its not then it would look like this:

    HX + XOH = H2O + Salt
     
  4. Feb 17, 2009 #3

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Huh?
     
  5. Feb 17, 2009 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    I don't think CO2 accepts a proton.
     
  6. Feb 18, 2009 #5
    what im trying to say is that a bronsted lowry equations is balanced 1:1 and usually produces either OH or H3O
     
  7. Feb 19, 2009 #6

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    What about ethylene diamine reaction with sulfuric acid? Still 1:1? Produces OH- or H3+?

    While what you wrote is right in many cases, it can't serve as a basis for understanding, as it is also wrong in many cases.
     
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