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Career as a scientific adviser?

  1. Aug 27, 2013 #1
    I have been exploring potential careers with a physics/ math or engineering degree and one job that interests me but I can not find much information on is being a science adviser. I would love to get some more info and possibly intern as one as a undergraduate. From what I understand you need at least a Ph.D. Also, what area of physics would be most in demand in this case. I wont necessarily go with what is demand, but I am curious because if my interests change to something more computational or maybe bio physics, is there still opportunities? So maybe, what is the general process of becoming a adviser and what should I expect?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 27, 2013 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Science adviser to whom?
     
  4. Aug 27, 2013 #3
    To the government, lets say congress or for the president, something higher up in the government.
     
  5. Aug 27, 2013 #4

    Choppy

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    I don't think that's something that's an independent career. Generally to be appointed as a policy advisor you need to be at the point in your career where you are giving invited talks and writing review articles. You get there by working in academia/industry and making substantial contributions that other people start to recognize.

    There are, of course, professional positions within "think tanks" (non-profit organisations that are set up to establish, review and advocate for certain policies) and that might be more of what you're looking for.
     
  6. Aug 27, 2013 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    What Choppy said. Science adviser to the President of the United States is not an entry-level position.
     
  7. Aug 27, 2013 #6
    Could you give me some more info on this "think tank" job?
     
  8. Aug 27, 2013 #7

    lisab

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    Working at a think tank is not an entry-level position, either. It's for people who have significant experience in often very narrow, specific areas. Working at a think tank is like being a consultant - you're only good if you can *truly* deliver results (read: $$$) for your clients. Funding can be very spotty, tenuous, and subject to political whims.
     
  9. Aug 27, 2013 #8

    SteamKing

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    I would set my sights on a different career, say president of a major university. The pay and the perqs are much better than that of a science advisor. Just ask the out-going president of NYU.
     
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