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B Carnot's Cycle

  1. Nov 1, 2016 #1
    Consider a Carnot's cycle diagram for an ideal gas. It will resemble a square.
    How do we know which side represents isothermal expansion/compression, which side shows work done by the gas or on the gas, adiabatic expansion/compression and which side represents the heat was added/exhausted?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 1, 2016 #2

    QuantumQuest

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    Take a look here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnot_cycle
     
  4. Nov 1, 2016 #3
    the diagram must have been drawn on a plane having axes X,Y and they must be representing some physical variables and the nature of changes in those set of variables , representing the changes in the state of the system actually gives you the identity/characteristic of those changes.
    so a carnot cycle represents a 'system going through a cycle of changes' analyse further taking a real example ...an engine ....of use in daily life.or go to primary concept of drawing a cycle of changes on a say gas in a cylinder with a piston blocking its escape.
     
  5. Nov 1, 2016 #4
  6. Nov 1, 2016 #5

    QuantumQuest

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    If you study the Carnot cycle diagram, you'll see which side of the diagram of the "Carnot engine" represents heat taken in from hot reservoir and which represents work done by the gas, among the other things. Now, work can be understood by the kind of process you have on each side and the heat taken or given by the engine.
     
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