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I Cartesian and polar quantities

  1. Sep 25, 2016 #1
    Hi,

    I have a little doubt. I have, refered to the Sun, the cartesian positions and velocities of an asteroid (in x, y and z coordinates - 6 values).

    I can easely calculate the polar coordinates (longitude and latitude - along with distance).

    My doubt is: how do I calculate the longitude and latitude speed in degrees/radians given the cartesian values? Is it the same way?

    I'm sorry for this stupid doubt....

    Kind regards,

    CPtolemy
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 25, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Probably - long and lat are not polar coordinate representations, they are grid coordinates on the surface of a sphere.
    You can convert ##(x,y,z)## to ##(r,\theta,\phi)## then you can convert ##(v_x,v_y,v_z)## to ##(v_r, v_\theta, v_\phi)## in the same way.
    Position and velocity vectors convert between coordinate systems the same way.

    You can check your understanding by finding ##\vec v = \frac{\partial}{\partial t}(r,\theta,\phi)##
     
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