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Cartesian Co-ordinates and Polar Co-ordinates

  1. Apr 25, 2004 #1

    JasonRox

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    Just to make sure I got this right.

    Cartesian is the popular x,y,z.

    Polar is the one with degrees, and has a circular shape.

    Is that it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 25, 2004 #2

    JasonRox

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    Another question I kind of forgot about in High School. :(

    When they say nEW, nEN, or xERe?

    I know some mean rational, real, or what not.

    Can anyone help?
     
  4. Apr 26, 2004 #3

    HallsofIvy

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    The only problem with your first post is that "x,y,z" is three dimensional and polar coordinates are two dimensional.

    In two dimensions, the point (x,y) in Cartesian coordinates is (r,θ) in polar coordinates. r is the straight line distance from (0,0) to (x,y) and θ is the angle the line from (0,0) to (x,y) makes with the positive x-axis.
    x= r cos(θ) and y= r sin(&theta).
    r= √(x2+ y2) and θ= arctan(y/x).

    In three dimensions, one can use either "cylindrical coordinates" or "spherical coordinates" as an analog to polar coordinates.
     
  5. Apr 26, 2004 #4

    JasonRox

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    Thanks, that helps now.
     
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