Casimir Effect

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi

For measuring the casimir effect in a experiment, two conducting plates are set up parallel to eachother. As far as I know, in all experiments so far there was always a small electric current induced in both plates.

So my question is: Why is this electric current necessary in such an experiment?

Thank you for an answer.

Philipp
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
As I didnt get any answers to my last post I would like to clarify my question in some
second post.

The main thing I want to focus on is, that there are so many external forces induced into the experiment, with which it becomes difficult to say, if there is Casimir Effect or not, or if it is corresponding with other factors like heat or a magnetic field. Of course I know that you can cancel out the external forces by estimating their noise effect, but wouldnt it be better to bring it as few as possible external forces in the first place?

In my opinion, for measuring the Casimir Effect there are basically only 2 things necassary. Two plates and a container for creating a vacuum. Any other things implemented into the experiment could create some external "noise".

Now when you look at recent experiments for the Casimir Effect like for example here: http://www.mit.edu/~kardar/research/seminars/Casimir/PRL-Lamoreaux.pdf

There is always a electric current inside the conducting plates. An this creates a magnetic field which can influence the plates behaviour. Furthermore in other recent experiments a temperature change on the surface on the plates was induces, which changes the pressure between the plates.
 

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