Cats versus dogs

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Which do you prefer?


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  • #1
micromass
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The age-old debate: cats or dogs. But which one does the PF community prefer?

Pam Brown said:
One small cat changes coming home to an empty house to coming home.

Josh Billings said:
A dog is the only thing on Earth that loves you more than he loves himself.

Let the fight begin :biggrin:
 

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  • #2
Ryan_m_b
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Dogs have a far more playful personality, can learn tricks, are genuinely excited to see you and feel like part of the family. Conversely my experience with cats has been that whilst they might like you you are merely an interesting creature that feeds them. Any playing, purring or otherwise social interaction seems entirely for their benefit. I've never heard of a cat coming to it's owners rescue then they are in trouble, or sensing when they are sad, or bringing slippers. Far more likely to wander off, scratch the walls and bring you a dead animal.

Also you can walk a dog, play fetch and have a game of frisby. Both of you will have fun and exercise doing this. If you try to walk a cat you look like you've lost several marbles and the only games you can play with a cat involve holding something for it to scratch or shining a laser. Fun for a little bit but gets old.

Also also dogs are a man's best fiend, we literally bred them over tens of thousands of years to be well suited to us.

Also also also a cat recently did this to me. Cats suck :frown:
 
  • #3
lisab
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I chose "both", but my affections towards each species are different.

I adore cats. I can watch a cat sleep and feel like I'm not wasting my time :biggrin:.

But dogs amuse me - they're such dopey goofballs.
 
  • #5
Astronuc
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I've grown up with both, but we usually have 2 or 3 cats and one dog.

My brother has 3 cats and 5-6 dogs, and 2 llamas and about a dozen or so sheep, several chickens and some geese.


I would love to have a couple of greyhounds with whom I could go running.
 
  • #6
jtbell
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I've never heard of a cat coming to it's owners rescue then they are in trouble

 
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  • #8
zoobyshoe
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Cats are self-cleaning, self exercising, and make very, very much less noise than dogs. Most cats are smaller than most dogs, therefore cheaper to feed. In my experience male cats are better because they are more independent, less needy and quieter (however they're more likely to commandeer your favorite chair). Dogs are very loud, raucous, smelly, usually large, and you have to walk them and pick up their poo.
 
  • #10
jtbell
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Also also also a cat recently did this to me. Cats suck :frown:

I was attacked by a dog while walking home from work last spring, and had to go to the hospital emergency room. Fortunately it was a superficial wound that didn't require any stitches, although there was a fair amount of blood.
 
  • #11
Medicol
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Cats are self-cleaning, self exercising, and make very, very much less noise than dogs...
That's not really true. Maybe it depends :wink:. Cats in my neighborhood freely walk around on the house roofs at night; they're silent creatures, they don't make noise while walking but 2-4 times a week I have to wake up at midnight to scare them all away. They like mating and every time before they make love, they mew like crazy, and are very noisy. The first time I heard one mew, I was thinking some baby was crying hard in the middle of the night on the roof.
 
  • #12
AlephZero
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Conversely my experience with cats has been that whilst they might like you you are merely an interesting creature that feeds them.

Or not even that. A colleague at work had a couple of cats which lived out of the house 365 nights a year (they had somewhere to shelter from bad weather, if they wanted to). When he went on vacation, the cats lived outside all day as well, and a neighbour had to job of feeding them.

Except one of the two used to disappear on the first day of vacation, and show up again when its "owner" returned. This happened for several years, and nobody ever discovered where it went for a couple of weeks each year.

One year, the cat didn't turn up. After a few weeks, they decided it was either dead or had left permanently, so they got a replacement.

After the next year's vacation, they had three cats. The missing one had taken a year's sabbatical (sabcatical?) somewhere unknown, and just turned up again and carried on with its old way of life as if nothing had happened.

Personally I don't find pet dogs very interesting. They need far too much time and attention.
 
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  • #13
zoobyshoe
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That's not really true. Maybe it depends :wink:. Cats in my neighborhood freely walk around on the house roofs at night; they're silent creatures, they don't make noise while walking but 2-4 times a week I have to wake up at midnight to scare them all away. They like mating and every time before they make love, they mew like crazy, and are very noisy. The first time I heard one mew, I was thinking some baby was crying hard in the middle of the night on the roof.
I know, but if you measure the decibels, those cats mating are not as loud as any barking dog the same distance away.
 
  • #14
Medicol
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I know, but if you measure the decibels, those cats mating are not as loud as any barking dog the same distance away.

Agree! and I think mouth guards should be used for all dogs.
 
  • #15
zoobyshoe
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After the next year's vacation, they had three cats. The missing one had taken a year's sabbatical (sabcatical?) somewhere unknown, and just turned up again and carried on with its old way of life as if nothing had happened.
I had a cat show up once whining for food. It was very skinny, but obviously people-friendly, so I fed it, and the next thing, it wanted to come inside. It stayed about six months. Then it disappeared for three whole days. Then it came back for three days. Then it disappeared for good. I think it had found a better crash pad and had just come back those last three days to say goodbye. Outdoor cats don't seem to be loyal to an owner. They shop and select the best all around deal they can find.
 
  • #16
Enigman
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They like mating and every time before they make love, they mew like crazy, and are very noisy.

Probably because cat penises are basically torture devices.
 
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  • #17
StatGuy2000
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I never really understood why people feel the need to compare the two, as cats and dogs are very different animals. I like both cats and dogs but for very different reasons. Cats are more independent than dogs but their behaviour can often be quite amusing, and they require less work to care for. Dogs, on the other hand, will treat you as the alpha dog/leader (which you are), and thus be more openly affectionate, and they do learn tricks, and can be more easily trained. At the same time, dogs who are poorly trained or untrained can be tremendously destructive to both you and others (chewing on food, biting, etc.). Not to mention if you own a dog, you must walk it, regardless of the weather, whether you are sick or tired, or what else.

My personal feeling is that dogs are happiest for people who own a home with a backyard and is within walking distance to a decent park. If you're an apartment or a condo dweller, cats may be more appropriate.

Another key thing to keep in mind is that owning any pet (dog or cat) is a major commitment and so potential owners should be very careful before deciding to adopt or purchase one.
 
  • #18
Evo
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Yesterday I was sitting talking on the phone and my dog threw his stick and hit me in the head. :devil:

Dogs are a LOT more work.

I still chose both, but I do prefer cats. You get more love for less trouble.
 
  • #19
collinsmark
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V9uNrFTOGY
 
  • #20
micromass
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To be honest, I wouldn't be surprised if cats were incapable of feeling love. I mean, they are solitary animals and don't really depend on each other. They don't have a pack mentality like dogs or humans. So I'm not sure if love would really be all that beneficial for a cat.

That said, when you have pet cats, they will certainly rub against your legs and sit in your lap. It's clear that they trust completely and that they somehow consider you to be important (maybe they consider you much like their mother). That's something to feel good about: when a normally solitary animal puts their trust in you and brings you food occasionally.
 
  • #21
Matterwave
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Dogs. I'm allergic to cats...so...no cats. Plus dogs just seem to be so much happier to hang out with you. Cats are so anti-social. :(
 
  • #22
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Dogs. I'm allergic to cats...so...no cats. Plus dogs just seem to be so much happier to hang out with you. Cats are so anti-social. :(

My cat loves to cuddle
 
  • #23
Matterwave
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My cat loves to cuddle

In my experience, since I never owned cats or dogs, whenever I visit someone who owns cats, the cats are always hiding somewhere. Whereas if I visit someone who owns dogs, the dogs come out and want you to pet them.
 
  • #24
micromass
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In my experience, since I never owned cats or dogs, whenever I visit someone who owns cats, the cats are always hiding somewhere. Whereas if I visit someone who owns dogs, the dogs come out and want you to pet them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbycvPwr1Wg
 
  • #25
lisab
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In my experience, since I never owned cats or dogs, whenever I visit someone who owns cats, the cats are always hiding somewhere. Whereas if I visit someone who owns dogs, the dogs come out and want you to pet them.

Cats are like emotionally healthy people: they have well-defined personal boundaries, and don't let just anyone in at first sight. You have to earn their trust and love. Once you do, they're often sweet, cuddly little house lions :!).

But this is a generality - there is significant variability in the personalities of cats.
 
  • #26
Astronuc
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My cat likes to sit on my chest and head-butt - a sign of acceptance and mutual affection. He occasionally grooms me.

Both cats like to be caressed - or stroked and gently rubbed.

The dog likes that too.
 
  • #27
Evo
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I love this
As seen in a dog's diary:

7 am - Oh boy! A walk! My favorite!

8 am- Oh boy! Dog food! My favorite!

9 am- Oh boy! The kids! My favorite!

Noon- Oh boy! The yard! My favorite!

2 pm- Oh boy! A car ride! My favorite!

3 pm- Oh boy! The kids! My favorite!

4 pm- Oh boy! Playing ball! My favorite!

6 pm- Oh boy! Welcome home Mom! My favorite!

7 pm- Oh boy! Welcome home Dad! My favorite!

8 pm- Oh boy! Dog food! My favorite!

9 pm- Oh boy! Tummy rubs on the couch! My favorite!

11 pm- Oh boy! Sleeping in my people's bed! My favorite!


As seen in a cat's diary:


Day 183 of my captivity...

My captors continued to taunt me with bizarre little dangling objects.
They dine lavishly on fresh meat, while I am forced to eat dry cereal. The
only thing that keeps me going is the hope of escape, and the mild
satisfaction I get from clawing the furniture. Tomorrow I may eat another
house plant. Today my attempt to kill my captors by weaving around their
feet While they were walking almost succeeded - must try this at the top of
the stairs. In an attempt to disgust and repulse these vile oppressors, I
once again induced myself to vomit on their favorite chair - must try this
on their bed.

Decapitated a mouse and brought them the headless body in an attempt To
make them aware of what I am capable of, and to try to strike fear in their
hearts. They only cooed and condescended about what a good little cat I
was. - Hmmm, not working according to plan.

There was some sort of gathering of their accomplices. I was placed in
solitary throughout the event. However, I could hear the noise and smell
the food. More important, I overheard that my confinement was due to my
powers of inducing "allergies."- Must learn what this is and how to use it
to my advantage.

I am convinced the other captives are flunkies and maybe snitches. The dog
is routinely released and seems more than happy to return. He is obviously
a half-wit. The bird, on the other hand, has got to be an informant and
speaks with them regularly. I am certain he reports my every move. Due to
his current placement in the metal room, his safety is assured.

But I can wait - it is only a matter of time.
 
  • #28
Dr Transport
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I voted dogs, but I would not give up any of my cats. My puppy chow is my bestest buddy.
 
  • #29
zoobyshoe
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To be honest, I wouldn't be surprised if cats were incapable of feeling love. I mean, they are solitary animals and don't really depend on each other. They don't have a pack mentality like dogs or humans. So I'm not sure if love would really be all that beneficial for a cat.

Cats aren't solitary animals at all. They're born in litters and, left like that, an extended society would develop. People break the litters up and tend to adopt out single cats. Those single cats become lonely and neurotic and have a hard time bonding with humans or other cats after that. Single cats get left alone in the house every day. They go nuts.

Left to their own devices, cats actually congregate in large groups and lie around and scope each other out, much like people at coffee shops.

http://messybeast.com/soc_cat.htm

Cats rub against their companions to mingle their scents and reinforce the bond. Biologists studying farmyard colonies noticed that lower ranking cats often rubbed against higher ranking cats. Rubbing also has a hierarchical function and a cat's social standing can be measured by the number of times other cats rub against it. When our cats wind round our ankles it is more than an affectionate greeting; they are letting us know that we rank higher than them. Maybe it's time to worry when Puss DOESN't rub round our ankles.

As well as the "rubbing hierarchy", later studies showed that some cats consistently choose to rest in close proximity to certain other individuals, but not close to certain others. Cat social structure was observed to be matriarchal, a little like a lion pride. Related females were more likely to socialise with each other than are unrelated females. Neutering has removed some of the distinction between male and female, with neutered males being happy to rest together. In a household, two unrelated cats who have lived together since kittenhood can be viewed as "related". Cats favour members of their own family - either their natural family (in a wild situation) or their adopted family (in a household).
 
  • #30
lisab
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Left to their own devices, cats actually congregate in large groups and lie around and scope each other out, much like people at coffee shops.

Holy moly that made me :rofl:! So true!

"Let's all get together in the same room; let's drink or eat or just sit, but not talk to each other. I just want to eat near others of my species but with no verbal interaction." I've often observed this weird behavior in humans and thought it odd, but I've not thought of feline behavior that way -- it certainly fits!

By the way, here's an adorable gif of a puppy learning to trust his human:

hcc0iD3.gif


No hesitation the second try :approve:.
 
  • #31
AlephZero
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As seen in a dog's diary:
...

I'm not convince dogs make good pets, for exactly that reason. These don't need to be played with to keep them happy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Pl8M53q0k
 
  • #32
Matterwave
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Cats are like emotionally healthy people: they have well-defined personal boundaries, and don't let just anyone in at first sight. You have to earn their trust and love. Once you do, they're often sweet, cuddly little house lions :!).

But this is a generality - there is significant variability in the personalities of cats.

I don't need my pet to be like another person, who I have to worry about personal boundaries...I don't want to earn the trust of a pet! My pet should just love me.
 
  • #33
zoobyshoe
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I don't want to earn the trust of a pet! My pet should just love me.
I wouldn't trust any pet that accepted me unconditionally. A pet like that would like Charles Manson as much as me.
 
  • #34
zoobyshoe
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Holy moly that made me :rofl:! So true!

"Let's all get together in the same room; let's drink or eat or just sit, but not talk to each other. I just want to eat near others of my species but with no verbal interaction." I've often observed this weird behavior in humans and thought it odd, but I've not thought of feline behavior that way -- it certainly fits!
After this past shark week I think sharks may be the same. It turn out the allegedly solitary great white is actually often found in the company of other great whites. These aren't exactly schools, but groups of 4-10 that seem to hang out in the same locale, within sight of each other.
 
  • #35
WWGD
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I like dogs. With relish and mustard; if there is too much of it, I just cut the mustard.

Still, I don't know why, but thought this would be about pictures of dogs and cats fighting each other; a strange topic.
 

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