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CCIE vs EE

  1. Sep 17, 2006 #1
    I was a bit surprised to find that the salary of a CCIE is twice the salary of an EE, how come that the Engineers who are designing the routes at Cisco are getting far more less paid than the people who operate them.
    Is there any logical explanation for this ?:bugeye:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 17, 2006 #2

    berkeman

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    What's a CCIE, and can you give a web pointer to your information source?
     
  4. Sep 17, 2006 #3

    Evo

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    abdo375, you're confusing an Electrical Engineering college degree with a Cisco Certification, which has nothing to with the degree. Employers who need people to be Cisco Certified do usually pay more for Cisco Certified techs. You just pay Cisco for the test and if you pass, you get the certification. It is tough though, but I've seen these guys getting $250 an hour, so well worth adding it to your name.

    CCIE - CICSO Certified Internetwork Expert

    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/learning_career_certifications_and_learning_paths_home.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2006
  5. Sep 17, 2006 #4
    Obtaining the CCIE takes a lot more than passing a test. You need to take a 100 question multiple choice exam before you even qualify to take the real test, which is an extremely grueling hands-on exam. You are required to set up a very high end internet backbone under a time constraint, and then over night it is screwed up in every way imaginable, and then you have to come in and fix the chaotic mess. IF you are able to pass this you are well worth the money to many companies. It's no joke. This isn't A+ certification or anything. It is one of the hardest tests out there.

    Normally, certs don't prove anything, but this isn't a typical certification. I have heard this cert being compared to the Ph.D. People spend years preparing for this "test". Frankly, having an EE degree doesn't prove you can do the work required of you. The CCIE is much better proof of this since you were able to pass this grueling hands on exam under a time constraint (lots of pressure).

    Whether or not it is fair that the CCIE makes so much more money than the engineer.....I do not know....however, I do know that there are VERY few CCIEs out there, and there are MANY electrical engineers. When AT&T needs a CCIE and there's only 2 out there in a 350 mile radius you better believe you're going to get paid a ridiculous amount of money.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2006
  6. Sep 17, 2006 #5

    Evo

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    Yes, they are difficult tests, and most employers that need people certified will provide training and pay for the test, at least the first test, the second test might be out of your own pocket, it depends on budget usually. Yes, it's a 2-part test, written then hands on. Most people I work with plan to fail the test the first time so they can familiarize themselves with it and then re-take it. You can re-take the written test every 5 days. It's slightly different each time you take it, but going through it once helps. I wouldn't equate this with getting a PHD in the sciences.
     
  7. Sep 17, 2006 #6

    berkeman

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    Interesting. So are most CCIEs part-time consultants that do something else full-time and do the CCIE work for gravy, or do most of them stay busy full-time at the higher rate? I'm happy where I am now (and stock options add gravy), but if CICE can be full-time for hotshots, that's interesting.
     
  8. Sep 17, 2006 #7
    Yeah, equating it with a Ph.D is a little bit extreme, but still, the test is no joke.
     
  9. Sep 17, 2006 #8

    Evo

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    They can be either. My favorite support tech has a CCNA, a CCIE and another couple. If you are full time, you get less per hour because you get benefits like health and funds matching, free legal etc...

    If you are an independant contractor, then you can charge more, hours aren't guaranteed and you have no benefits.
     
  10. Sep 17, 2006 #9

    berkeman

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    Sounds like the normal consulting routine. Dang, $250/hr x 2000 hr per year full time is a lot of money. I'm smart enough with the right (but over-qualified) background -- where do I sign up?:devil:
     
  11. Sep 17, 2006 #10

    Evo

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    Less than 3% that test for ther CCIE pass., but doen't surprise me, a lot of them are really not qualified.

    Even a CCNA is good.

    Then go hit up companies that need techs. I have a client that may be needing one soon if this take s off, heck, I'll go work for him. He's got the contacts, he needs people that can do the networks. Just from this one deal he says he's going to "spin" me, I'll get roughly $385,000 for the deal. He's already got the deal locked under me at my company.
     
  12. Sep 17, 2006 #11

    chroot

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    berkeman,

    I've considered some of the same career paths... EE vs. computer science, that kind of thing. I'm currently a senior designer for a major semiconductor company, but my background is entirely in software. I considering going the network-engineer route, but, honestly, the market for those kinds of careers has cooled off a lot in the post dot-com years.

    There's no downside to further education, but I think a EE position is a lot more stable than the situation of most of the 'network consultant' contractors I've known. YMMV.

    - Warren
     
  13. Sep 17, 2006 #12

    chroot

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    If I'm not mistaken, you are the exception, not the rule, yes?

    - Warren
     
  14. Sep 17, 2006 #13

    Evo

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    Actually, half of my group has already capped out $500,000 annually in commisions this year (on top of their salary), I am no where close yet. :-(

    I was offered a Network Planning Engineer job a couple of months ago, but I need 18 months time and title, but I'm loved in that department, and I have so much experience, and have made some goood friends.. That's where I want to go. The job description calls for an advanced degree, CCIE & CCNA, + 10 years network experience. I can do this. And the guy I've been woking with would love to hire me as soon as he gets headcount. He's already had me send him my resume. KEEP YOUR FINGERS CROSSED!
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2006
  15. Sep 17, 2006 #14
    Send some of that money this way when you get that job! :tongue:

    Have you seen my porsche thread???
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 17, 2006
  16. Sep 17, 2006 #15

    chroot

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    Are you suggesting that the average network engineer makes half a million dollars a year?

    - Warren
     
  17. Sep 18, 2006 #16

    Evo

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    No, you have to be in technical sales. I make way more than my engineer with both the CCNA & CCIE. I want to get out of sales though (too stressful) and move over to network engineering, pay for that job is only in the $90,000 - $110,000 range, no commisions, but no more stress. The stress is killing me.
     
  18. Sep 18, 2006 #17
    WOW EVO,


    Do you make half a million dollars a year ???


    WOW WOW WOW

    Talkin' 'bout "one rich chick"...Lookin' for a (Belgian) husband ?

    :rofl:

    marlon
     
  19. Sep 18, 2006 #18

    Evo

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    Not yet. :-( most of the people making that have been here at least 2-6 years, I've only been here a year. I'll probably die from the stress before I reach that.
     
  20. Sep 18, 2006 #19
    Geezzuuss, that's just incredible. Our Prime Minister does not even make that kind of money. yep, it IS true. If you are "average to good" you are better of econimically in the USA. That's what the American Intel Assignees always say to me at work.

    I really should move to your nice country Evo, and get rich and die from stress too.

    marlon
     
  21. Sep 18, 2006 #20

    chroot

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    It's all play money anyway, marlon. A decent house out here where I live starts at $500k, and a "nice" house runs a million.

    - Warren
     
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