Celebrating Death

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People I know seem fairly polarized between whether or not it's acceptable to celebrate bin Laden's death. Any thoughts?
 

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  • #2
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I play dead pools so I'll celebrate if certain notable people that I like die.
 
  • #3
Evo
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People I know seem fairly polarized between whether or not it's acceptable to celebrate bin Laden's death. Any thoughts?
I see it as a means of closure for thousands of grieving families, and a significant blow to the realm of terror he started.
 
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  • #4
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People I know seem fairly polarized between whether or not it's acceptable to celebrate bin Laden's death. Any thoughts?
I'm happy about it. He killed thousands of innocent people. How am I supposed to feel?
 
  • #5
lisab
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Personally, no I could never celebrate a death.

But the reaction we're seeing, I think it's more complicated than what's on the surface - it's not just a simple celebration, IMO.

It's been a tough decade. Seemingly endless wars, draining our spirit and blowing up the deficit. Still almost 10% unemployment, stagnant wages.

I think we're all just ready to either turn a corner, or let our heads explode (figuratively of course). And this event comes along...it's like the perfect catharsis.

We needed this.
 
  • #6
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On morality grounds, we can argue forever in circles and still not reach anywhere. Nonetheless from my personal perspective, I would not cherish anyone's death. I would be happy about consequences resulting from the death if there are some positive consequences.

Only thing I really felt really sad about was that Osama was killed in front of his 13 years old daughter.
 
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  • #7
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It's been a tough decade. Seemingly endless wars, draining our spirit and blowing up the deficit. Still almost 10% unemployment, stagnant wages.
When it feels too tough, you can always look at people in Afganistan/Pakistan/Iraq :smile:
 
  • #8
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Here are the arguments of some people i know (no names of course):
Against:
"a life is still a life no matter how atrocious the person" - person A
"how civil of a society are we if we parade in the streets when we kill a man" - A again
"its not up to any human to decide if someone is worth being treated as a human being" - person B
For:
"bin laden left it up to his judgement whether or not he should take the lives of 3000 people. He was a menace and needed to be destroyed." - Person Z

There's more, but I think I got the main parts.

There are certain acts one can do to forfeit his humanity, and mass murder is one of them.
 
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  • #9
russ_watters
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It's a celebration of justice and his death wasn't really necessary for it. I'd be almost as happy if he had been captured.
 
  • #10
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nobody cares anymore since he probably moved on from running the show a long time ago.

His gang probably did him in to create a distraction. He was useless to them so they threw him out to get caught so that everyone will feel safe all of the sudden... then BOOM. <- could happen, you never know
 
  • #11
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i dont think anyone i know really cares. everyone i speak to just replies that they heard about it already.
 
  • #12
chiro
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Personally I'm kinda stunned.

The US has spent over a trillion dollars (of your money), killed many hundreds of thousands of people, and created a huge mess in other countries (Afghanistan and Iraq) and I'm supposed to think one man in a mansion actually makes a difference? You're telling me that all of the above was worth this one man?

Then people turn around and say they have defeated the terrorists. Whoever was responsible for those attacks also had a victory. The security state is what a terrorist actually wants. The terrorist wants its victim to be frightened, to be in constant fear: thats the whole point of terrorism: almost its very definition.

Look at what is happening at your airports. Do you really need to put 3 year olds through microwave machines and frisk them because they have a bomb? When people are scared, the terrorists have won.
 
  • #13
chiro
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Also when I talk about the US killing people I am talking about the US military and not your average US citizen and I understand that most US people are civilized and against some of the atrocities that have been committed.
 
  • #14
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killed many hundreds of thousands of people
Is it really that high?
 
  • #15
cobalt124
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Celebrating death will achieve nothing. I'm glad I read this and the bin laden thread to put some perspective on what is happening because otherwise (and not only in the U.S.) the response to bin Ladens death looked really ugly to me. Did the glorification thing for the Falklands War (!) and for the first Gulf War and I look back in shame. Much better to just bring bin Laden to justice, be happy that that has been achieved, leave it there and move on.
 
  • #16
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I'm just happy justice is served. I couldn't care whether he was alive or dead. Either way, we got him.
 
  • #17
cobalt124
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I was expecting The Sun newspaper to revive its "Gotcha" headline from the Falklands War. It came up with "Bin Bagged". Ugh!
 
  • #18
AlephZero
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In the west, when someone dies you usually celebrate their life, not their death.

The chanting flag wavers in the US only goes to show that the mentality of gun law and the lynch mob is still alive and kicking. Given the number of times the US administration as changed its story, it's anybody's guess what really happened. In any case, isn't this the third time the US have told the world they killed OBL?

The most interesting thing here is the tidal wave of popular protests that hasn't swept across the entire Islamic world. Apart from one statement from Hamas, does anyboby except the Washington rent-a-mob and the news media actually care? Or do they know something that the US adminstration doesn't?

Real life goes on as before. Five Bangladeshis arrested for suspicious behaviour near the Sellafield nuclear waste reprocessing site in the UK, for example...
 
  • #19
Ryan_m_b
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Celebrating the death of a guy who caused the deaths of thousands isn't too bad a thing so long as people keep their heads. The thing I am most weary of is people thinking that This Is It! Osama Bin Laden isn't the evil bad guy sitting in a cave co-ordinating the worlds evil. He was one guy who was the figurehead of terrorism. This isn't the end of a bond film, it's just another step in our constant kill kill culture we've developed.

And whilst I am not an expert on how the operation was carried out I think killing him was a mistake. He should have been arrested, bought back to the US and put on trial.
 
  • #20
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In any case, isn't this the third time the US have told the world they killed OBL?
I had heard speculative reports in the past, but this is the first time our president has DNA evidence from his body in military possession. It's about as reliable as can be.
 
  • #22
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Unfortunately, yes. It is very high.

A year 2008 article in Guardian estimates the number of deaths in Iraq is in between 100,000 and 1 million.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/mar/19/iraq
Well it's nice to see the accuracy they're working in. :rolleyes:

As terrible as both numbers are, that is a very large margin of error to be working in.
 
  • #23
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I'm just happy justice is served. I couldn't care whether he was alive or dead. Either way, we got him.
The US Navy got him, not "we". Give credit where credit is due.
 
  • #24
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The US Navy got him, not "we". Give credit where credit is due.
Well given the debate on who did what (obama/bush nonsense), I'm just using a blanket statement to avoid any further nit picking.

Clearly failed. Given your attitude towards myself in the past it's not surprising the response you gave either.

My own personal thoughts give credit to those people who actually went in and did the job - but as I said, didn't want to fuel the current debate with people.
 
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  • #25
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The chanting flag wavers in the US only goes to show that the mentality of gun law and the lynch mob is still alive and kicking....
There are idiots all over the world not just the US .. OBL death event is heavily emotional/sentimental.
 

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