Cell broadcast (HOW FEASIBLE)

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In summary, the conversation revolved around implementing cell broadcast for updating people on a university campus. The individual was curious about the percentage of phones that currently support it and the feasibility and economics of implementing such a system. They also mentioned being familiar with the theory and having an old phone that accepts cell broadcast. The other person suggested that current systems are likely not more complicated than sending mass emails or text messages. The individual also shared their knowledge of cell broadcast appearing like text messages on the phone screen and being used for displaying location and discounts. A document from 2007 was referenced, stating that cell broadcast is already present in most network infrastructure and phones, eliminating the need for additional infrastructure or software.
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I would want to implement cell broadcast for updating people with issues on the ground on a university campus.My problem is I want to know what percentage of phones support it now and how feasible it could be, the economics of it. I am familiar with the theory .Thank you
 
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I'd be surprised if current systems were any more complicated than just sending a mass email/text message to peopele's phones.
 
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What I know is that cell broadcasts are like text messages which appear on the screen of the phone.Usually just below where you find the name of the service provider.So far I have seen several networks display district location and discount on the phone screen .I want to know just about anything about it .I have an old Sumsung sgh-r220 even that accepts cell broadcast.
 
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I know it's been a while, but this http://transition.fcc.gov/pshs/docs/advisory/cmsaac/pdf/CellCastComment070307.pdf" [Broken] from 2007 says that "Cell broadcast is already resident in most network infrastructure and in most phones, so there is no need to build any towers, lay any cable, write any software, or replace terminals".
 
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What is cell broadcast and how does it work?

Cell broadcast is a technology used by cell phone networks to send text messages to multiple devices within a specific geographical area. It works by using special cell broadcast channels, which are separate from the channels used for regular phone calls and text messages. The messages are sent out by the network operator to all devices within range of a specific cell tower, regardless of whether the device is actively being used or in sleep mode.

Why is cell broadcast considered a more efficient way of sending emergency alerts?

Cell broadcast is considered more efficient for emergency alerts because it allows for messages to be sent to a large number of devices simultaneously, without causing network congestion. This is particularly useful during emergencies when network traffic is high and traditional methods of communication, such as phone calls and text messages, may be delayed or fail to reach all recipients.

Can cell broadcast be used for non-emergency purposes?

Yes, cell broadcast can be used for non-emergency purposes as well, such as sending weather alerts, public safety messages, and commercial advertisements. However, these messages are typically limited to a specific geographic area and are subject to regulations set by the network operator.

What are the limitations of cell broadcast?

One limitation of cell broadcast is its reliance on cell towers. If a cell tower is down or experiencing technical difficulties, the messages may not reach all devices in the designated area. Additionally, devices must be within range of a cell tower to receive the messages, so areas with poor network coverage may not receive the alerts.

How feasible is the implementation of cell broadcast?

The feasibility of implementing cell broadcast depends on various factors, such as the network infrastructure, technology used, and regulatory requirements. In most cases, it is a cost-effective and efficient way to send emergency alerts, but it may require significant investments and coordination among network operators to be successfully implemented on a large scale.

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