Central Asia - Scythians, Tatars, . . .

  1. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    It came up in a GD thread that Cronxeh speaks Tatar, which is a Turkic language.

    Turkic peoples originated in Central Asia, and there seem to be several groups, although at the moment I am not clear.

    During the last 3000 years, there have been a lot of migrations and mixing of peoples throughout the Eurasian lands (from Western Europe to Mongloia and Manchuria).

    Often migrations or invasions spawn additional migrations, and as a consequence Central Asia and Eastern and Central Europe have seen many different groups of peoples.

    In the middle of all this are the Scythians ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scythians ), Tatars ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatars ) and others. I am still trying to figure out the history and who went where and when. :biggrin:

    Wiki is just a starting point

    Also the Tatar language has a very interesting history:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatar_alphabet

    http://www.omniglot.com/writing/tatar.htm

    http://www.omniglot.com/writing/orkhon.htm
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    Timur, Timor,

    Adding to the previous post - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scythia

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timur

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurgan -
    The area of central Asia is rich in history and human migration. The westward movement of Mongols and other nomads put pressure on the pastoral cultures, which migrated to what we now consider eastern Europe. And some east Asian tribes made their way to central and western Europe. Also, various Turkic tribes pushed south and collided with Arab (Syria and Iraq) and Persian cultures.

    See also -

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tatarstan
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Russia
     
  4. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    The history of Central Asia - a featured article on Wikipedia.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Central_Asia

     
  5. Timur means iron also in mongolian.
     
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