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Centrifigal Force

  1. Jul 10, 2003 #1
    I am currently try to figure out the amount of pressure on a moving part that weights about an 1/2 oz. It spins at a rate of 285 rpms around the outside of a 4 inch cylinder.
    I'm sure there has to be a formula of some sort that can assist in this calculation. Thanks for any help you may be able to give.

    Thanks,
    RanMan
    www.prewettmills.com
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 10, 2003 #2

    Janus

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    F= Mv²/r

    where M is the mass of the object,

    v is it's velocity

    r the radius

    You'll have to convert oz to mass units and find the object's velocity from the radius and rpm.
     
  4. Jul 10, 2003 #3
    Janus, I appoligize for the detailed questions but I know absolutely nothing about physics.
    I do not know how to determine the velocity nor do I know how to convert ounces to mass. I'm sorry for not knowing a thing about physics.
    All I know is the information that i need which is the force.

    Thanks,
    RanMan
    www.prewettmills.com
     
  5. Jul 10, 2003 #4

    Janus

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    Well the unit of mass in the FPS system is the slug, and a one slug mass would weigh 32.175 lbs, and there are 16 ounces to a lb.

    so mass = 1/(32.175x16)/2 = .0009625 slug.

    The circumfernce of a circle of radius 4 in. is 2*4* pi = 25.13 in. or 2.094 ft.

    This is the distance the object travels in one revolution. it does this 285 times per min, so its velocity is 2.094*285 = 596.79 ft/min.

    divide this by 60 to get ft/sec for 9.9465 ft/sec and you have v

    thus
    r = .33333 ft
    M= .0009625 slugs
    v= 9.9465 ft/sec

    plug them in to the formula, and you'll get the force in pounds.
     
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