Centrifugal Force: What Is It?

In summary, centrifugal force is the apparent outward force experienced by an object moving in a circular path, due to its inertia. It is not a real force. It is often confused with centripetal force, which is a real inward force that keeps an object in a circular path. Centrifugal force can be calculated using the formula F = m * v^2 / r. Some real-world examples include the feeling of being pushed outwards on a merry-go-round and the swinging motion of a thrown hammer. It is not a fundamental force, but can be explained by the laws of motion and gravity.
  • #1
alchemist
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is there such a thing as centrifugal force?
what is it?
 
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  • #2
If you swing a yoyo around your head, the centrifugal force is what your hand feels. The centripetal force is what the yoyo feels.
 

1. What is centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force is the apparent outward force experienced by an object that is moving in a circular path. It is a result of the object's inertia and is not actually a real force.

2. How is centrifugal force different from centripetal force?

Centrifugal force and centripetal force are often confused. While centrifugal force is an apparent outward force experienced by an object, centripetal force is a real inward force that keeps the object moving in a circular path.

3. How is centrifugal force calculated?

Centrifugal force can be calculated using the formula F = m * v^2 / r, where F is the centrifugal force, m is the mass of the object, v is the velocity, and r is the radius of the circular path.

4. What are some real-world examples of centrifugal force?

Some examples of centrifugal force include the feeling of being pushed outwards when riding a merry-go-round, the swinging motion of a hammer when it is thrown, and the outward bending of a spinning yo-yo string.

5. Is centrifugal force a fundamental force?

No, centrifugal force is not a fundamental force. It is an apparent force that can be explained by the laws of motion and gravity. It is also not included in the standard model of physics.

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