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Centripetal force and Acceleration

  1. Nov 23, 2003 #1
    This is a weird question but live with me please.

    I was completing a math competition (www.comap.com)with my team today and when we finished I started wondering about that "room" airforce pilots and NASA astronauts go into. I can't remember the name of the "room" but it is where they get strapped into a seat attached to a large metallic "arm" and it spins the around in a circle (in order to test how astronauts/pilots react to G forces). So anyways, I was sitting on a chair that could spin on its axis very well (i.e. a long time without stopping due to friction (lack of force giving constant velocity)) and I decided to start spinning very fast and then to close my eyes to feel "inside" the centripetal force clinging me to the chair (excuse me if I am using words wrong, I haven't really taken Physics yet). Basically, I wanted to feel what the pilots go through in that "chamber"/"room". The first time around for like 3 mins I was fine. The second time I tried . . . I DEFINITELY FELT SICK.

    I am wondering how people endure the effect of being spun around in circles at very high speeds and also I am wondering how can you spin without becoming sick.

    Thx!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 23, 2003 #2

    enigma

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    It's called a centrifuge.

    Spinning on a chair won't give you the same sensation. It is the distance from the axis of rotation which gives the 'g' force effect.
     
  4. Nov 23, 2003 #3

    russ_watters

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    Most amusement parks have a centrifuge. Try it sometime.
     
  5. Nov 26, 2003 #4
    I'd think that what your felt like 3 minutes was more like 30 seconds. To spin seriously around on chair could be asking for a mighty vomit. I believe I've read its quite harmful to untrained person, more than getting G's in real centrifuge.

    Sickness is due to liquid in inner ear that is responsible for our up/down perception gets spit around and affects nerves in inconsistent manner. I believe its same kind of sickness as seasickness. With longarm centrifuges, you don't spin around your axis, so all that liquid is at same end of your brain, thus there is no sickness. Then come Gs.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2003 #5
    while in a centrefuge i belive the circle is not great enough to become a significant sickness worry. Like you psin on the earth but dont get sick :) o(only obviously on a much smaller scale). And besides if your travelling at 5-6G, you aint ognna have enough force to project anything :P
     
  7. May 4, 2007 #6
    i think, as other people said, it's different, but also (to digress a little) some people are more likely to feel sick when they spin around, and i think you can sort of practice it too. i'm in figure skating, and i don't think i get as dizzy and disoriented as i used to when i spin around:smile:
     
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