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Chances of getting in?

  1. Nov 4, 2006 #1
    I'm a physics major at a SUNY school. I have a 3.90 GPA, got a 1380 on the GRE and expect ~750 on the GRE physics that I took today. I also have decent research experience. I know you can't really say for sure but what would my odds be for a school like Cornell, Stony Brook, or UIUC?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 4, 2006 #2
    According to some data I found, the average GRE (for enrolling students) at those schools are

    Cornell ~800
    UIUC ~780
    Stony Brook ~800

    Check out gradschoolshopper.com

    I think the verbal-quant. split is also important (in particular, the verbal).
     
  4. Nov 4, 2006 #3
    I had a 590/770.

    After looking through all the average GRE Physics scores at some of these schools it feels like I have no shot at getting into somewhere good :cry:
     
  5. Nov 4, 2006 #4

    Office_Shredder

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    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Keep in mind that if those are average, it means there are people with lower scores
     
  6. Nov 4, 2006 #5
    I thought you were already in graduate school mathlete, and I thought you were at UIUC for undergrad.
     
  7. Nov 4, 2006 #6
    No, i'm not... do I know you? :confused:
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2006
  8. Nov 4, 2006 #7
    Also, an unrelated question since I don't want to make too many threads. From what I can see, all these graduate schools require individual recommendation forms. This seems pretty stupid to me. Do people really give their professors a shaft of recommendation forms and ask them to complete each one? I don't think i'd be comfortable applying to even 2 schools because of this (added to the fact that i've already asked for recommendation forms which I can send out through my school's service).

    Can anyone "enlighten" me here?
     
  9. Nov 4, 2006 #8
    Are you the mathlete from the genmay forum? I recall the mathlete from the genmay forum claiming that he posted on this forum.
     
  10. Nov 4, 2006 #9
    Hmm... not sure what you mean, I dont know what this genmay forum is?
     
  11. Nov 4, 2006 #10
    well the head of grad school admissions here at cornell gave us a talk this year (senior physics majors) on what he looks for in applications and he said that a good gpa and research experience will be more important than a perfect GRE score anyday. From what he told us, it seems you would be the ideal candidate in his eyes and he will be running the grad school admissions this year...

    Now i'm another story all together, i get very good grades in both math and physics and have taken lots of advanced classes and i expect good GRE scores from the test today, but i have no research experience at all so i don't know how schools will feel about me, despite the fact that I specifically am interested in theory rather than experiment.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2006
  12. Nov 5, 2006 #11
    Thanks for that! Makes me feel better

    So i'm planning on applying here so far:

    Cornell
    Berkeley
    UIUC
    University of Rochester
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Does anyone think I have a shot at getting into at least one? I'm so scared about getting rejected from all of them and having no place to go after I graduate :cry:
     
  13. Nov 5, 2006 #12

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Why not put a "safety school" or two on your list? It's fine to aim high, but you don't want to risk leaving yourself empty-handed.
     
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