Change in energy = the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water?

In summary, the change in energy refers to the difference in energy before and after a reaction or process, specifically the change in thermal energy. A calorimeter is a device that measures heat released or absorbed during a reaction, using the change in temperature of surrounding water. Water is commonly used in calorimetry experiments due to its high specific heat capacity. The heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water is equal to the change in energy, and can be used to calculate the enthalpy change of a reaction.
  • #1
apchemstudent
220
0
I think the answer is d). Am i correct? Because the change in energy equals the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water. If not, can you please provide an explanation for your answer. Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Chemistry question.jpg
    Chemistry question.jpg
    22.1 KB · Views: 438
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Looks good to me.
 
  • #3


Yes, you are correct. The change in energy is equal to the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water. This is because the calorimeter is used to measure the heat absorbed or released during a chemical reaction. The heat absorbed by the calorimeter is then transferred to the water, causing a change in its temperature. Therefore, the change in energy is a result of both the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water.
 

Related to Change in energy = the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water?

What is the meaning of "change in energy" in this equation?

The change in energy refers to the difference in energy before and after a reaction or process. In this equation, it specifically refers to the change in thermal energy.

What is a calorimeter and how does it measure heat?

A calorimeter is a device used to measure the amount of heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction or physical process. It works by trapping the heat within a closed container and measuring the temperature change of the surrounding water.

Why is water commonly used in calorimetry experiments?

Water has a high specific heat capacity, meaning it can absorb and retain a large amount of heat energy without a significant change in temperature. This makes it an ideal substance for measuring the heat absorbed in a calorimeter.

How does the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water relate to the change in energy?

In the equation "Change in energy = the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and the water," the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water is equal to the change in energy. This means that the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water is essentially the same as the change in thermal energy of the reaction or process being measured.

Can the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water be used to calculate the enthalpy change of a reaction?

Yes, the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water can be used to calculate the enthalpy change of a reaction. This is because the heat absorbed by the calorimeter and water is equal to the change in thermal energy, which is directly related to the enthalpy change of a reaction.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
621
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
23
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
693
Back
Top