1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Change in Temperature Equation HELP Please!

  1. Jan 22, 2012 #1

    FFX

    User Avatar

    Hey Everyone,

    First time posting here, but you'll probably see me around quite a bit!
    If this is in the wrong math spot please let me know, I don't understand the different types of maths.

    I have an equation on the change of temperature, I substituted all the values in correctly and thought I was working it out correctly, but my answer came out far too low for me to think I did it correctly. If someone could have a look and give me guidance, that'd be great. The first picture is the full question, the second is me 'trying' to work it out! :(


    2cgfzag.png

    30s7uxl.png
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 24, 2012 #2

    BruceW

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I think you went wrong on the very last step.
    [tex] \frac{440.022}{( \frac{23.43}{2.556 \times 10^{-8}})}[/tex]
    Does not equal [itex] 4.80023 \times 10^-6[/itex]. You've gotten it 10 times larger than it should be. But this is still a problem, because you said you were expecting a larger answer. Are you sure you've got all the units right?

    P.S. Welcome to physics forum :)
     
  4. Jan 29, 2012 #3
    Off topic, but What program did you use to show your work? I am taking online precalc and whatever program you are using would make my life much easier. Thanks!
     
  5. Jan 29, 2012 #4

    BruceW

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    who, me or ffx? I'm using latex, which physics forums 'supports' or however you call it.
     
  6. Jan 29, 2012 #5

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    This forum uses LaTeX, a math formatting language. You can use html tags [ tex ] and [ \tex ] (without the spaces) or, to fit it onto a line, [ itex ] and [ /itex ] (again without the spaces).

    There is an introduction to its use here:
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=8997
     
  7. Jan 29, 2012 #6
    I was curious about FFX's method. I was looking for something a little more user friendly than Latex. Perhaps I am getting the wrong impression.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  8. Jan 29, 2012 #7

    BruceW

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    hmm, I'm not sure how ffx wrote all that working, because he's put it on here as an image. Maybe message him, hope he answers?
     
  9. Jan 29, 2012 #8

    FFX

    User Avatar

    Cheers for the replies!
    Sorry for my delayed response, working full time and studying full time leaves me limited free time!

    Thank you for correcting my mistake Bruce. I just 'assumed' the answer should be bigger. But a couple people on this site have already stated that there's no reason why I should assume a bigger answer when the question doesn't have any indication of what the size of the number should be! So the answer you provided would be correct, thank you!

    @Neverquit
    I didn't actually use any specific math program. I just used microsoft word. If you go 'insert' - 'equations' in microsoft word, you'll be given a toolbar with all the different math symbols. It's very easy to use but it doesn't work anything out for you automatically, everything must be typed in manually so it's a slow process.

    I'm taking my math course externally, so I find microsoft word works for me as I can easily email off my assignment when necessary.
     
  10. Jan 30, 2012 #9
    Thanks FFX, good luck with your studies!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Change in Temperature Equation HELP Please!
Loading...