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Change in the centre of mass of a leg

  1. Nov 22, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    To keep the calculations fairly simple, but still reasonable, we shall model a human leg that is 92.0m long (measured from the hip joint) by assuming that the upper leg and the lower leg (which includes the foot) have equal lengths and that each of them is uniform. For a 70.0kg person, the mass of the upper leg would be 8.60kg, while that of the lower leg (including the foot) would be 5.25kg. a) Find the x-coordinate of the center of mass of this leg, relative to the hip joint, if it is stretched out horizontally. b) Find the y-coordinate of the center of mass of this leg, relative to the hip joint, if it is stretched out horizontally. c) Repeat parts a and b for the leg if it is bent at the knee to form a right angle with the upper leg remaining horizontal


    2. Relevant equations
    Centre of mass equation: c.m = m1s1 + m2s2 . . . / m1 + m2 . . .



    3. The attempt at a solution
    No idea how to do this one. I know the basic formula as shown above, but I can't seem to be able to find the right answer by plugging in the numbers given. I don't even know how to go about part c, so more or less i'm trying to figure out how to properly do this question. If anyone can be of assistance it would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
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