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Charge decay

  1. Mar 22, 2009 #1
    Has charge (magnitude) [edit] lost some of its value since the time of the big bang? If so, what's the theory behind this?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 22, 2009 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    The answer to your first question is no.
     
  4. Mar 23, 2009 #3
    Then, when does the Planck charge show up in nature?
     
  5. Mar 23, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    It doesn't.
     
  6. Mar 23, 2009 #5
    What is the significance of the Planck charge?

    Its value seems to be a key part of some physical constants including the electric and magnetic constants. It must be in nature somewhere, right?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  7. Mar 24, 2009 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    No. It's no more and no less natural than a Coulomb.
     
  8. Mar 24, 2009 #7
    Can you say the same thing about the rest of the Planck constants?
     
  9. Mar 25, 2009 #8

    Vanadium 50

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    Nuby, what are you getting at? You clearly have something in mind. Can you just say it?
     
  10. Mar 25, 2009 #9
    It just seems like Planck charge is the odd balll out of the Planck units. Why isn't the planck charge value used instead of the elementary charge value, so the coulombs force constant could be derived?
     
  11. Mar 25, 2009 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    What does that mean? You can write Coulomb's Law using any units for charge that you like. Number of electrons, coulombs, esu's, lots of things.

    Like I said - it's clear that you have something in mind. Spit it out, man! I'm not going to waste any more of my time trying to guess what you are asking. Say it clearly or not at all.
     
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