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Charge induced on plastic by metal

  1. Jun 18, 2005 #1
    1.Will a charge be induced on a plastic-made object if a charged metal is put near it?
    2.Is the sharing of charge between two conductor(placed on a insulator) is considered as a current?

    I think charge can be induced similar to the way in which charged is induced in water. But, I am not sure whether their body molecular size affect this characteristic.
    For the second one, I am not sure as it seems to me that no complete circuit is present.
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 18, 2005 #2


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    No, because the electrons are bounded to the atoms in an insulator. You can polarize the material somewhat by placing it in an electric field. The nuclei are shifted slightly along the field lines and the electrons in the opposite direction, and this adds to the field. But the electrons don't move any significant distance as they would in a conductor.

    I'm not sure what you mean for the second part. Is charge flowing from one conductor to the other? If so, that's a current.
  4. Jun 21, 2005 #3
    sorry for this.
    If I stand on a insulator, and I touch a charged object, is it considered as a current?
  5. Jun 22, 2005 #4


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    Anytime charges move from one place to another it is considered a current. Some currents do not last very long. If you stand on the insulator and touch a charged object there will be some current that flows into your body until you become sufficiently charged to no longer attract the charges in the object. This could happen very quickly, and it could happen with a spark that jumps between you and the charged object. The current will not persist if you are standing on the insulator unless the charge on the object is varying.

    If you stand on an insulator and touch a conducting wire carrying household current at 115 volts ac, there will be a small current flowing into and out of your body. As long as you do not touch anything that provides another path out of your body for that charge, you probably will not even feel it. However, if there is a path through you to another object that can carry current easily, you will feel a shock as the current flows through you.
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