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Chasles' theorem

  1. Jan 26, 2016 #1

    hunt_mat

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    Homework Helper

    Suppose I have an element of [itex]SE(3)[\itex]. I know this can be thought of as a translation along an axis and rotation about that axis due to Chasles theorem.

    My question is simple: How do I go about computing the axis, length of the translation, angle of the rotation and radius of the rotation?

    It sounds as if it could be rather algorithmic but for the life of me I can't seem to find much information on it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 26, 2016 #2

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

  4. Jan 26, 2016 #3

    hunt_mat

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    Sort of. I will have a look. What I wanted ideally was something which would give me an algorithm to computing them.
     
  5. Jan 26, 2016 #4

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    An algorithm heavily depends on an accurate definition of the input.
    To be honest I haven't found and don't know about the Chasles' theorem. There have been several related formulations and connected theorems (e.g. Euler). The only advantage I might have had is to search in an additional language. E.g. I found an article from Zurich but it was plenty of wording and only few formulas.
     
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