Cheaper by the Dozen: 2 for $1, 36 for $2, 475 for $3

  • Thread starter Jimmy Snyder
  • Start date
In summary, the item being discussed is numbers for house addresses, with the price being 2 for $1, 36 for $2, and 475 for $3. DarkEternal is correct in guessing that the item is cheaper by the dozen DVD, as nobody wants to buy it. BicycleTree's guess is also likely correct.
  • #1
Jimmy Snyder
1,127
21
There's an item in the store, the price of which is 2 for a dollar. 36 can be had for 2 dollars and 475 will cost you 3 dollars. What is the item?
 
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  • #2
The cheaper by the dozen DVD because nobody wants to buy it? :biggrin:
 
  • #3
I have seen this before.
 
  • #4
guess: numbers, the metal ones, for house addresses?
 
  • #5
DarkEternal, of course, is correct. And so, probably, is BicycleTree.
 
  • #6
i don't get what DarkEternal means...
 
  • #7
ArielGenesis said:
i don't get what DarkEternal means...

You know how you can buy the actual numbers to nail up on your house for your address? Let's say each one costs $1.00. Now read what he has up top. The number "2" will cost... $1.00. The numbers "3" and "6" (36) will cost you $2.00. And the numbers "4", "7" and "5" will cost you $3.00.
 

Related to Cheaper by the Dozen: 2 for $1, 36 for $2, 475 for $3

1. How is it possible for "Cheaper by the Dozen" to offer 36 items for only $2?

The phrase "Cheaper by the Dozen" is a marketing strategy that implies a bulk discount. By purchasing 36 items at once, the cost per item decreases, resulting in a lower overall price.

2. Is there a limit to the number of items that can be purchased for $3?

Based on the pricing model, there is no limit to the number of items that can be purchased for $3. However, it is important to note that the price per item will decrease as the quantity increases, so purchasing a larger quantity may result in a better deal.

3. Are the items in "Cheaper by the Dozen" of equal value?

The price of the items in "Cheaper by the Dozen" may vary depending on the product, so not all items may be of equal value. However, the goal is to offer a bulk discount, so the overall cost per item should be lower than if purchased individually.

4. Can "Cheaper by the Dozen" be applied to any product or only specific items?

The pricing model of "Cheaper by the Dozen" can be applied to any product, as long as the quantity and price per item are adjusted accordingly. However, it is most commonly used for products that are commonly purchased in bulk, such as food or household items.

5. How does the price per item compare between "Cheaper by the Dozen" and purchasing items individually?

The price per item in "Cheaper by the Dozen" will typically be lower than if the items were purchased individually. This is because the bulk discount allows for a decrease in the overall cost per item. However, it is important to compare prices and make sure that the bulk discount is actually a better deal for the specific items being purchased.

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