Checking My Force, Torque calculations

In summary, the pressure being exerted on the gears is 8000psi, with each gear experiencing 4000psi. The torque being applied to each gear is 1880 inch pounds. It is important to double check and triple check calculations for accuracy, and to consider other factors that may affect the gears in this scenario.
  • #1
MrDiedel
3
0
500lbs pressing down on two gears. Surface area of contact on one gear is 0.03125 inches squared.

I calculated pressure.
500lbs / 0.0625 = 8000psi being exerted onto the two gears' surface areas. One gear has 4000psi.

The gears' radius is 0.47 inches.

I calculated torque for an individual gear.
4000psi (0.47 inches) = 1880 inch pounds. (I think I just found my mistake, but I'll finish posting this with my new results).

So the torque being applied to the gears is 1880 inch pounds each.

I guess working through the problem for the 3rd time helped. But I would welcome anyone to double check my triple check. I still may have misunderstood something and my calculations are off.
 
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  • #2


it is important to always double check and triple check our calculations to ensure accuracy. Based on your calculations, it seems that the pressure being exerted on the gears is indeed 8000psi, with each gear experiencing 4000psi. The torque being applied to each gear is also correct at 1880 inch pounds.

One thing to keep in mind is that the surface area of contact between the gears may change as they rotate, so the pressure and torque may not remain constant throughout the entire rotation. Additionally, the materials and design of the gears may also affect the amount of pressure and torque they can withstand.

Overall, it seems that your calculations are accurate and I would suggest also considering any other factors that may affect the gears in this scenario. Great job on your calculations!
 

Related to Checking My Force, Torque calculations

1. What is force and torque?

Force is a push or pull on an object resulting from its interaction with another object. Torque is a twisting force that causes rotation.

2. Why is it important to check my force and torque calculations?

Checking your force and torque calculations ensures that your measurements and analyses are accurate and reliable. It also helps prevent errors and potential safety hazards.

3. How do I calculate force and torque?

Force can be calculated by multiplying mass by acceleration (F = ma). Torque can be calculated by multiplying force by the distance from the pivot point (T = F x d).

4. What are some common mistakes to avoid when calculating force and torque?

Some common mistakes to avoid include using incorrect units, not considering all forces and torques acting on an object, and not accounting for friction or other external factors.

5. How can I double-check my force and torque calculations?

You can double-check your calculations by using different methods or equations, consulting with another scientist or expert, and performing experiments or simulations to verify the results.

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