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ChemE books

  1. Jan 12, 2005 #1

    cronxeh

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    Why are all Chemical Engineering books at least a $100 or more, while Applied Physics books go for around 20-30 bucks a piece?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 12, 2005 #2

    Dr Transport

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    Because Chemical Engineers know how to make money and Applied Physicists are in it for their own gratification.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2005 #3

    selfAdjoint

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    I was told by a chem-e friend that chem-e's make more money than other engineers, and have shorter life spans (from inhaling all those chemicals).
     
  5. Jan 13, 2005 #4

    cronxeh

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    yes well i switched from ChemE to MechE and the difference between the two is merely +5k for ChemE in salary a year.

    The point about the books is that in both instances the material is practically the same - fluid dynamics, mass/energy transfer, etc. Yet applied physics books are cheap and have more in-depth theorital material, while ChemE books usually have examples with some theory, which isnt always even explained in terms of how it was achieved.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2005 #5

    Bystander

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    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/prod...urceid=1500000000000001827190&dest=9999999997

    http://www.alibris.com/search/detai...8165413227&pqtynew=0&page=1&matches=2&qsort=r

    Couple classics in physical chemistry --- "kwitcher belly-aching." Book prices are set by what the market will bear, position on the best seller lists, and by publication "set-up" costs --- anything less than some minimum number printed really runs up the price --- chem Es never pay for books out of pocket (this is the assumption in pricing), employers buy the books, or the taxpayers cover the costs as "professional expenses" deductions. Best-sellers? Technical books are bestsellers?

    H, C, & B (the green monster) is a classic --- the price reflects it --- $600? Yikes! I gotta buy a "book vault." Harned & Owen? 'Nother classic. Out of print --- used to be an ACS "cash cow" --- got nicked sumpin' 'tween 50 - 100 bucks 30 years ago --- it hasn't appreciated quite as much.
     
  7. Jan 13, 2005 #6

    cronxeh

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    I was talking to a guy who was doing graduate study in ChemE and he told me that ChemE is overresearched. Is there any truth to this?
     
  8. Jan 13, 2005 #7

    Bystander

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    This is more a question for academic and career guidance --- "overresearched?" That's what everyone says when the project vanishes around the corner in the toilet --- another 2-3 years work staring you in the face, digging out the literature, reading, getting back up to speed, equipment, apparatus construction/set-up, wrangling with the thesis committee, TAing for money, dumpster diving for food, furniture, and clothes ------ eevvveeerrrryyyyything is "overresearched."
     
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