Chemical and electrical gradient for ion X+

In summary: Remember to take breaks and not to overthink things too much. Good luck!In summary, the conversation discusses the existence and direction of electrical and concentration gradients for ion X+ in a hypothetical cell, as well as the potential flow of X+ across the membrane. It also touches on the importance of seeking help and not overthinking in challenging situations.
  • #1
runner2392
11
0
Please check my answers. I tend to over-think and get simple questions wrong.

A hypothetical cell membrane is positively charged on the intracellular side and negatively charged on the extracellular side. In this cell, the concentration of ion X+ in
the intracellular space is high and in the extracellular space is low.

http://s1140.photobucket.com/albums/n575/sanjanz2392/?action=view&current=f.jpg

1) Does an electrical gradient exist for X+? If it exists, what direction is the electrical gradient?
a) No.
b) Yes, inward.
c) Yes, outward.

Yes, outward because opposite charges attract each other. I'm not completely sure because neither a membrane potential nor an equilibrium potential is given for the cell and ion.

2) Does a concentration gradient exist for X+? If it exists, what direction is the concentration gradient?
a) No.
b) Yes, inward.
c) Yes, outward.

Yes, outward. high --> low

3) Imagine an ion channel opens that allows X+ to flow. Will X+ flow across the membrane,
through the ion channel? If so, what direction will the net electrochemical gradient(s) for X+ favor it flowing? (Assume the two gradients are of equal magnitude.)
a) Yes, it will flow from extracellular to intracellular.
b) Yes, it will flow from intracellular to extracellular.
c) No, it will not flow.

Yes, it will flow from intracellular to extracellular.


4) What reasoning led you to your determination of which direction the ion would flow?
a) Both the chemical and electrical gradients favor movement out.
b) Both the chemical and electrical gradients favor movement in.
c) The chemical and electrical gradients balance each other out.
d) There are no gradients acting on X+.

Both the chemical and electrical gradients favor movement out.

5) Based on the concentration gradient, would you predict that the equilibrium potential for X+ is a positive or negative value? (Consider: you need an electrical force to counteract the chemical force.)
a) positive membrane potential
b) negative membrane potential

positive membrane potential b/c electrical force is always equal and opposite of chemical force. chemical force is in, so electrical is out meaning X+ favors a more positive membrane potential at equilibrium


PLEASE help. I'm really frustrated with this class.
 
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  • #2
I'm sorry to hear that you are having difficulty with the class. Have you thought about talking to your instructor for assistance? You could also ask a classmate or someone else who is knowledgeable about the subject for help understanding the material. Additionally, you may want to consider joining a study group or finding a tutor who can help you review the concepts.
 

Related to Chemical and electrical gradient for ion X+

1. What is a chemical gradient for ion X+?

A chemical gradient for ion X+ refers to the difference in concentration of ion X+ between two areas. This can be caused by a variety of factors such as diffusion, active transport, or osmosis.

2. How is a chemical gradient for ion X+ created?

A chemical gradient for ion X+ is created when there is a higher concentration of ion X+ in one area compared to another. This can be achieved through active transport, where cells use energy to move ions against their concentration gradient, or through diffusion, where ions move from areas of high concentration to areas of low concentration.

3. What is an electrical gradient for ion X+?

An electrical gradient for ion X+ refers to the difference in charge between two areas. This can be caused by the movement of ions, which carry a positive or negative charge, across a membrane.

4. How is an electrical gradient for ion X+ established?

An electrical gradient for ion X+ is established when there is a difference in charge between two areas. This can be accomplished through the movement of ions across a membrane, or through the action of specialized ion channels that allow specific ions to pass through and create a charge difference.

5. What is the relationship between a chemical gradient and an electrical gradient for ion X+?

The chemical gradient and electrical gradient for ion X+ are closely related and often work together to maintain homeostasis in cells. The movement of ions across a membrane through diffusion or active transport creates both a chemical and electrical gradient, as ions carry a charge. These gradients can then affect the movement of other ions and molecules, ultimately influencing various cellular processes.

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