1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Chemistry: Atomic Orbital

  1. Apr 2, 2008 #1
    Hey just need help regarding a few questions.

    1. Which is more stable, C 2s or C 2p? Why? Choose the best answers from below:
    (a)higher shielding (b) lower shielding (c) lower n value (d) lower l value

    2. Which is more stable, Ar 5p or Ar+ 5p? Why? Choose the best answers from below:
    (a)higher shielding (b) lower shielding (c) lower n value (d) lower l value

    3. Which is more stable, Ar 4s or Ar 5s? Why? Choose the best answers from below:
    (a)higher shielding (b) lower shielding (c) lower n value (d) lower l value

    So does higher shielding means the valance electron are less tightly held by the nucleus? Hence unstable? What does n and l has to do with these questions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 3, 2008 #2
    I would think higher shielding meant closer to the nucleus and so held MORE tightly, but not 100% on that.

    n and l would be along the same idea. The lower n or l would mean closer to the nucleus and this would be an electron held more tightly
     
  4. Apr 3, 2008 #3
    N refers to the energy level, and l would refer to the magnetic quantum number, i.e. what kind of orbital it is in (s, p, d, f, etc). l = 0 = s orbital, l = 1 = p orbital, and so on.
     
  5. Apr 4, 2008 #4
    So does higher shielding means the valance electron are less tightly held by the nucleus? Hence unstable? What does n and l has to do with these questions?

    Higher shielding probably means "higher shielding effect", i.e. inner electrons...

    n describes the location and energy of the electrons

    l describes the shape... s which is spherical? p which is dumbbell?

    Try drawing the atomic orbitals to aid your quest.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Chemistry: Atomic Orbital
  1. Atomic orbitals (Replies: 5)

Loading...