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Chess problem: White to mate in 2

  1. May 18, 2005 #1

    Galileo

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    I'd like to share with you guys one of the most beautiful chess problems I've ever seen.

    See the attachment for the setup.

    It's white's turn. Mate in two.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. May 18, 2005 #2
    Nice one!

    Answer in white:
    edit: scrap it! :grumpy:
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  4. May 18, 2005 #3
    1. c7 Kb7(...Kxa5 2. Rxa7++; ...b5 2. Qc8++) 2. Qc8++
     
  5. May 18, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

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    Drat,i can't see the attachement.:grumpy: I thought the bugger would keep happening to someone else.

    Daniel.
     
  6. May 18, 2005 #5

    Galileo

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    Nope. Black responds with b5-b4 (the pawn is already on b5) and white can then only check in 2 ways, neither giving mate.

    Any luck with the attachment Dex?
     
  7. May 18, 2005 #6
    Yes, quite amusing, answer in white: Pawn takes pawn en passent
     
  8. May 18, 2005 #7
    Me either. It says I don't have permission to access that page. :(
     
  9. May 18, 2005 #8
    I first got that message too. Click "Log Out" and you will be able to see it. Go figure.
     
  10. May 18, 2005 #9
    First I will post and then read the other solution.

    Not quite sure but if the previous step is a5 b5 then enpassant and white wins in second step. Or in continuation to my earlier game Qc8+ Kxa5 and Rxa7++.

    Now I will see what Jimmy says.
     
  11. May 18, 2005 #10

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    This problem is an excellent example of what the logician and chess fan Raymond Smullyan calls "retrograde analysis".

    The clue to solve the problem is:
    What MUST black's last move have been?

    However, quark's solution seems valid.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  12. May 18, 2005 #11
    There may be another way; but this should work.

    Pawn at C6 to C7.
    - If Black takes Pawn at A5 with King,
    - Rook at A8 to A7. Check Mate!!!

    - If Black moves Pawn at B5 to B4,
    - Pawn now at C7 to C8 (change to Queen). Check Mate!!!

    - If Black moves King from A6 to B7,
    - Pawn now at C7 to C8 (change to Queen). Check Mate!!!

    Those are the only three moves black can do after moving from C6 to C7.


    Check Mate!

    As for what Black had to have done last move :

    He moved his Pawn from B6 to B5.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  13. May 18, 2005 #12

    arildno

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    No, Rahmus, that is an IMPOSSIBLE history of the game!
    Think again..
     
  14. May 18, 2005 #13
    I thought enpassant could only be used as that Pawns first move??? I guess I don't know chess as well as I thought I did.
     
  15. May 18, 2005 #14

    arildno

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    Quite so..
     
  16. May 18, 2005 #15
    Did I mess up in my denoting of where the pieces are? Or why is it impossible? I don't see it. I do see one lapse... hmmm... let's think this through again... Wait!... I guess one of those would be a check mate in three moves... darn...
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  17. May 18, 2005 #16

    arildno

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    The white king is now at c5.
    Thus, if black's last move was to move his pawn from b6 to b5 (creating the situation displayed), that would have meant that white was IN CHECK from that pawn and chose not to move his king on his previous move, or alternatively positioned his king at c5 as his last move. But, either way, this is illegal for white to do..

    Hence, b6-b5 cannot have been Black's last move.
     
  18. May 18, 2005 #17
    Ahhh... I see. I had the rules of enpassant a little wrong. So blacks move in the turn before was:

    Pawn at B7 to B5.

    Right???

    And with that in mind my answer has changed. :biggrin: Although I did have a good strategy; but not knowing Blacks last move was the trick. So:

    Enpassant from white Pawn at A5 to B6. Then Black is forced to move his King from A6 to A5, and then white moves his Rook from A8 to A7.

    Check Mate!

    Is that correct???
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
  19. May 18, 2005 #18

    Galileo

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    Yes, but the continuation will require 3 moves in total.
     
  20. May 18, 2005 #19

    arildno

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    Yes, I just discovered that.
    Great retrograde problem, Galileo.
    Do you have Smullyan's books on this?
     
  21. May 18, 2005 #20
    I learned a possible two move check mate from start; but white has to be really dumb and black has to know what's going on. Even still... it would be fun to see it actually happen. Short game. :smile:

    White moves his Pawn from F2 to F3
    Black moves his Pawn from E7 to E6

    White moves his Pawn from G2 to G4
    Black moves his Queen from D8 to H4

    Check Mate!
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2005
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