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China and South Korea

  1. Apr 5, 2006 #1
    I traveled for the last past 12 days in China Macau and South korean. It was an eye opener for me.
    You can ask me any questions about the two region with the best of my ability. My main interest is to read other peoples opinions about the people, and culture of this two region( southern china, south korea).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2006 #2
    :biggrin: okay, let me ask you. Did you have watery-crab porridge in Macau and braised beef ribs in Korea? They are delicious :approve:
     
  4. Apr 5, 2006 #3
    Hello,
    I had a talk with a fellow who came from China a while ago, so I too know a little bit but anyway I'd like to know something from you.
    From the point of view of a traveler, how do you see Chinese government?
    Are laws very strict like they seem to be?
    How did you like people? Were they nice to you?
    Walking along crowded streets of Chinese city, did you get a big head ache from all the talks around you? (joke)
    And, did you notice in both Korea and China something that was totally different from your previous thoughts and feelings about them? Something that you had never thought of?

    Thanks,
     
  5. Apr 5, 2006 #4
    :cry: :cry: :cry: aggggggghhhhhhhhh!!! I have a secret but I cannot tell you Heartless!!!!!!
     
  6. Apr 5, 2006 #5

    mrjeffy321

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    I had a similar question I wanted to ask you about your view of the [Communist] Chinese government. Did you notice it [the communism] much, or did everything seem normal to you? (I have my own opinion from my travels, but I dont want to influence you).

    Where are you from? Could you speak the lanuage when you went to China / Korea?

    Did you notice the different colors of the military/police? Green/brown/darker brown/blue all in one city, what is the deal with that?
    Do the Chinese police [those guys who stand on the street corners and dont move, who I only assume are police] carry guns? I dont remember.
     
  7. Apr 5, 2006 #6
    First of all, I am South Korean, So I also will try to answer these questions.

    Korea and China use completely different lanuguages, although the roots are pretty close (although korean is closer to japanese than chinese in grammer)

    People will be very interested in you if you are foreign.
     
  8. Apr 5, 2006 #7

    Integral

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    A co-worker of mine is just back from his first trip home to China in something over 20 yrs. He says the change is incredible.
     
  9. Apr 5, 2006 #8

    mrjeffy321

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    That is VERY true.
    It was a little strange how many people would come up and ask to have their picture taken with me (as if I was some sort of celebrity) while in Beijing and Xian. I couldnt figure out why I was so popular (and I couldnt ask them why), but it pleased them to no end to speak a few words of English to us and take a picture.
    I actually have a picture of me, having a picture taken of me with someone else.

    As for the languages, Korean (Hangul) is a much nicer language I think (both visually and the way it sounds). For one thing, typing the lanuage is easier on a key board, instead of having to spell out the sound of the chinese character you want using English letters [or atleast that is how I was told they do it].
     
  10. Apr 6, 2006 #9
    :biggrin: yeah things are quite different in China now, even a soya sauced duck is selling at RMB280,000, wonder why:biggrin: [​IMG]
     
  11. Apr 7, 2006 #10
    I can t say i am very fond of the city( macau). The people are rude, corrupt, dirty, and have very little civic responsibility. Perhaps, it is the remnent of third world habits, or perhaps this is the third world. There are no rule of law. People would cross the dirty, garbage ridden streets with out much regard for street lights. People would spit on the streets, and pick their nose in public space. there is no rule of law. The public sophistication is low. The scholar is not revered. Everyone seem to live in the moment. You can see food stands that serve grassy, oily food to students walking out the schools. This is a culture that belief the world is bad, cruel and the only to way to servive is by stepping on other people. The idea of education, and individual worth is earning money. This city challenge my morality. I feel bad for the children that grow up in such unsupportive, chaotic, lawless world around them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2006
  12. Apr 7, 2006 #11
    What is the big deal about that, Polly? do that picture really amuse you that much? Get a life.
     
  13. Apr 7, 2006 #12

    HeHe Polly I know your secret! Calm down!!!! :)
     
  14. Apr 7, 2006 #13
    Wow.. And you learned all that in 12 days!! You must be VERY observant! :rolleyes:
     
  15. Apr 7, 2006 #14
    Sure, you don t have to trust everything i wrote. These are merely my observations. I am just telling you what i saw. All american should feel very fortunate to be born american. Even for the poorest American, you would still be in a much better position to develop your fullest genetic potential. You are taugh consciously or unconsciously a set of moral values, and the view that life is limitless. This is one of the most valuable asset for any individual human being. Over here, racial bias is not a taboo, but a fact of life. People are taught to be bad just just to survive. The cultural sophistication here is similiar the pre-industrical revolution in europe.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2006
  16. Apr 7, 2006 #15
    Sorry couldnt resist

    I can t say i am very fond of the city(Los Angeles). The people are rude, corrupt, dirty, and have very little civic responsibility. Perhaps, it is the remnent of third world habits, or perhaps this is the third world. There are no rule of law. People would cross the dirty, garbage ridden streets with out much regard for street lights. People would spit on the streets, and pick their nose in public space. there is no rule of law. The public sophistication is low. The scholar is not revered. Everyone seem to live in the moment. You can see food stands that serve grassy, oily food to students walking out the schools. This is a culture that belief the world is bad, cruel and the only to way to servive is by stepping on other people. The idea of education, and individual worth is earning money. This city challenge my morality. I feel bad for the children that grow up in such unsupportive, chaotic, lawless world around them.
     
  17. Apr 7, 2006 #16

    fuzzyfelt

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    A serious question, how readily available and relatively expensive are organic and free range (not including poultry:smile: ) foods and products in Hong Kong?
     
  18. Apr 7, 2006 #17
    :biggrin: ahhh, we are not bothered with the new agey thing, we reckon even if we can avoid the pesticide on the vegetable, mercury in the fish, asthma drug in the pork (to yield more lean meat) and the chicken with flu, we will surely be killed by the polluted air and the murderous working pressure :biggrin: .
     
  19. Apr 7, 2006 #18

    fuzzyfelt

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    terrific!:yuck:
    thanks, Polly.
    I also note the schools provide measures in case of extreme weather. How often do you tend to be affected by severe weather?
     
  20. Apr 7, 2006 #19
    Too bloody unoften enough! :grumpy:
     
  21. Apr 7, 2006 #20

    Mk

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    To what level? If you go to... India. Boy do all those kids really stare at the white man.

    In Thailand they are not as interested in you, but hey, being white is a sign of wealth, they're always touching your face and looking at you and smiling and stuff.

    3rd world Africa is like India. Yeah, don't go. All the kids just stare at you and want money. If I gave money to rupees, well I'd have to give rupees to the next 25, then turn around and hand them out.

    If you really feel scared, you can grab a handful and throw the opposite way you are going to run.

    I <3 America.

    So how well populated are different areas of South Korea? What cities did you go to? Did you visit any rural areas? What did you buy? How was the food? What was the extent of globalization? How close were military influences where you were? What was the general attire? How were women treated different than men? What kind of jobs did people have? Any especially notable places you visited? Same questions for China. :) How was it touring around China? Did you have to have somebody following you around? Did you stay in a tour group the whole time? Do you have any pictures? Pictures would be so lovely! I am very interested. Are they up on the internet somewhere like http://photobucket.com or a blog?

    :biggrin: Thanks anybody that answers.

    What was the value of the dollar?

    I remember how Claude from Spain loved America so much. Something I remember was something like this:

    How is it in China and South Korea? I expect it to be more like Spain.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2006
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