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Chirac storms out of EU summit

  1. Mar 24, 2006 #1
    BBC Europe
    I'm miffed.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2006 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    What a dweeb.
     
  4. Mar 24, 2006 #3

    Astronuc

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    Sacre bleu! :rolleyes: :biggrin: :rofl:
     
  5. Mar 24, 2006 #4

    Moonbear

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    How is it that people can be world leaders and still act so childishly? Maybe that's why it's called the old boys' club; they haven't grown up enough to act like men. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Mar 24, 2006 #5
    Let me guess it was his translater.:rofl:
     
  7. Mar 24, 2006 #6

    Pengwuino

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    Which begs the question of why doesn't the average joe feel a connection towards their representatives.
     
  8. Mar 24, 2006 #7
    When I was at Charles de Gaulle airport a few months back, some officer insisted on speaking in French to me when I asked him for directions, even though I was yelling most of what I know at him: "Je ne parle pas Francias!" What a douchebag. I almost missed my flight. :grumpy:

    I'm all for patriotism, but stuff like this is ridiculous.
     
  9. Mar 24, 2006 #8

    Pengwuino

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    Yah don't you just hate when people are sooooooooooo anal with stuff like that? Reminds me of TSA's rant about the idiots who act like... idiots when they are trying to get onto the campus he works at.

    What's the saying.... 'your only as big of a person as the things that set you off are'
     
  10. Mar 24, 2006 #9

    Moonbear

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    Yeah, I just hate it when you go to France and they all insist on talking to you in French. :rofl:
     
  11. Mar 24, 2006 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    No kidding! That would be like expecting Americans to speak English! :uhh:
     
  12. Mar 24, 2006 #11

    Pengwuino

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    Lazy Americans! :grumpy:

    This is all like California though where you're expected to know mexican in order to interact with the society here. And yes, it is called mexican becuase it's gotten far enough from spanish to be called a new language :biggrin:
     
  13. Mar 24, 2006 #12
    Of cource they don't speak English they speak American(Americanese for those people who we can't understand).I think American and english are becoming more and more sepereted.For example have you ever herd a Briton say "Y'all"(it's a part of American offical dialic)?I even went to sites that had the option of changing the languge to American(somtimes they incorrectly say American English but this inccorect) and UK english.
    I think American should be coniserd it's on languge.:approve:
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2006
  14. Mar 24, 2006 #13

    Pengwuino

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    It really should, yo!

    Australians need their own language! What is all this crap. "oi" "ay mate" "*insert ever other word an australian citizen says*"
     
  15. Mar 24, 2006 #14
    "crikey" "g'day mate" "'ow bout ya toss anutha shrimp on tha barbie"
     
  16. Mar 24, 2006 #15

    Math Is Hard

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    Il a eu raison. Quelle horreur!
     
  17. Mar 25, 2006 #16

    JamesU

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    what a l'idiot stupide de whiny
     
  18. Mar 25, 2006 #17
    On that note, I believe French-speaking Quebecers consider their language to be completely different from French (though I believe the difference is larger than the one between American and British English). In fact, the working class consider proper/Parisian French to be an "accent of a chicken's rectum" or something like that.
     
  19. Mar 25, 2006 #18

    Its sad that this is true. I used to work in a phone center in San Fernando, and it was like a godsend when every once in a while we'd get someone who spoke proper castellano, rather than the perversion that is spoken on the streets. So much more pleasant on the ears. It was like the difference between listening to a cambridge professor of english speak english and listening to a bum in new york city speak english.
     
  20. Mar 25, 2006 #19

    Math Is Hard

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    My mom forced my sister to take two years of Spanish since they live in Texas and she thought it would be useful. My sister says it doesn't help her in communicating with Spanish-speaking people in Houston. She can't understand them at all. The language has probably been twice bastardized - once in Mexico and again after it came across the U.S. border.
     
  21. Mar 25, 2006 #20
    Canadian French, from what I can gather, represents an historically older French than Parisian French: it's what most French speakers sounded like when they came over during the early colonization years. Once they left France the accent and grammar of Paris took over and became the one people looked to as a "standard" French, I'm guessing simply because that city became so influential over all others in France.

    There's a story, I don't know if it's true, that there's a community in the Appalachian mountains where they still speak a dialect of English that is not much changed from when the first settlers of that community came over in the 1500's. If that story's true, Standard British English, or what you'd hear the average British newscaster speaking, would sound as different to them as present day Parisian French does to a French Canadian.

    My grandmother was French Canadian, but I never learned any French from her. I learned some Parisian French in high school and college. Last time I tried to talk to my Grandmother in French I could hardly catch a word of what she said, while she could understand me perfectly. Her vowels were completely different! For "huit", the number 8, I learned to say something like "wheat". She pronounced it "whit". For "chat", meaning "cat" I learned "shaht". She pronounced it "shot".
     
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