Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Chlorination mechanism

  1. Dec 9, 2004 #1
    Chlorination mechanism....

    In chlorination, with chlroine gas and methane, why does the UV light cause the chlorine atom to split into free radicals? I know that it "supply the energy", but what actually happens?

    Thanks. :wink:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2004 #2

    movies

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yes, you form two Cl radicals. One Cl radical can then abstract a hydrogen atom from methane to make HCl and a methyl radical. The methyl radical can then combine with another Cl radical to make the product, chloromethane.
     
  4. Dec 9, 2004 #3

    chem_tr

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Well, Movies answered the question fairly well, but I think there is something with [tex]h\nu[/tex]; the energy in photon causes the sigma bond to be homolytically (just in the middle) cleaved, giving away two radicals, as Movies also wrote. The rest is very clear from his post.
     
  5. Dec 9, 2004 #4

    movies

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yes, chem_tr is right. I guess I glossed over how that actually happens. I have always thought of it as exciting the vibration of the Cl2 molecule until the Cl-Cl bond is essentially "ripped" apart.
     
  6. Dec 9, 2004 #5
    Yeah I think it's to do with Eistien's E=hf and homolytic fission occurs in Cl2. The free radical is very reactive, and can therefore substitute a hydrogen from methane.
     
  7. Dec 9, 2004 #6

    GCT

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You should see this in the perspective of free energy diagram, if you wish to "know what happens." It should be given in your text.
     
  8. Dec 10, 2004 #7
    Thats really quite an advanced question. If you want to know the real answer, you learn it in either third semester physics (modern physics) or second semester physical chemistry.

    It has to do with the energy state of the electrons in Cl-Cl bond. In this case, it happens that the electrons in the sigma bond absorb light in the frequency of the UV region, because their energy states are matched by the energy of the photon, where E = hf. The excited electrons jump up to a higher energy state, which causes the bond to "break" and disassociate homolytically.
     
  9. Dec 11, 2004 #8
    Thanks so-crates - could you please elaborate further on how the bond actually breaks?
     
  10. Dec 12, 2004 #9

    chem_tr

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    As he said, a single sigma bond with two electrons can be cleaved homolytically, if each electron is a sigma bonding and sigma* antibonding orbital; in this case, the bond is homolytically broken. The photonic energy is very high to supply this excitation.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Chlorination mechanism
  1. Chlorine Poisoning? (Replies: 7)

  2. Disolve chlorine (Replies: 1)

  3. Sampling Chlorine (Replies: 3)

  4. Methanol chlorination (Replies: 1)

  5. Chlorine and bromine (Replies: 6)

Loading...