Choose a voltage V <2.5 V

  • Thread starter Mosaness
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Voltage
In summary: So if you want the voltage to be 2V instead of 1V, just double the resistance to 2Ω.In summary, to find values for the resistors in the given circuit to achieve specific currents, we can use Kirchhoff's laws and Ohm's law. By choosing a voltage of 1V and a resistance of 1Ω for R1, we can solve for the remaining resistors to achieve the desired currents of 1A, 1.2A, 8A, and 3.1A for i1, i2, i3, and i4 respectively. If a different voltage is desired, the resistance values can be scaled proportionately to maintain the same
  • #1
92
0
1.Choose a voltage v < 2.5 V and values for the resistors R1, R2, R3, and R4 in
the circuit of Fig. 3.90 so that i1 =1 A, i2 =1.2 A, i3 =8 A, and i4 = 3.1 A.




Homework Equations



KCL/KVL/OHms Law



The Attempt at a Solution



If Is = I1 + I2 + I3 + I4,

Then, Is = [itex]\frac{v}{Req}[/itex]

Req = [itex]\frac{1}{R1}[/itex] + [itex]\frac{1}{R2}[/itex] + [itex]\frac{1}{R3}[/itex] + [itex]\frac{1}{R4}[/itex].

After this, I get stuck...
 

Attachments

  • 3.90.png
    3.90.png
    4.4 KB · Views: 500
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You're over thinking the problem. For parallel branches, the voltage is the same to all branches of the node. For simplicity choose 1V and for R1 choose 1 ohm so that I1 = 1A. Now you have the voltage and current for each branch so just solve for resistance via ohm's law.
 
  • #3
Bhumble said:
You're over thinking the problem. For parallel branches, the voltage is the same to all branches of the node. For simplicity choose 1V and for R1 choose 1 ohm so that I1 = 1A. Now you have the voltage and current for each branch so just solve for resistance via ohm's law.

So because we can choose any v that is less than 2.5V, you picked 1V correct?
 
  • #4
Taking V as 1A and using the given values for the currents, I solved for R1, R2, R3, and R4:

R1 = 1V/1A = 1Ω

R2 = 1V/1.2A = 0.83Ω

R3 = 1V/8A = 0.125Ω

R4 = 1V/3.1A = 0.323Ω

Is this correct?
 
  • #5
Looks good. And if for some reason you need the voltage to be higher than you can just scale the resistance proportionately to maintain the same current.
 

1. What is the significance of choosing a voltage V <2.5 V?

The significance of choosing a voltage V <2.5 V is that it falls within the safe operating range for most electronic components. This means that using a voltage lower than 2.5 V will not damage the components and will ensure proper functioning.

2. Can I use a voltage higher than 2.5 V?

It is not recommended to use a voltage higher than 2.5 V, as it may exceed the safe operating range for electronic components and potentially damage them. It is best to stick to the recommended voltage range to ensure proper functioning and longevity of the components.

3. How do I choose the specific voltage for my project?

The specific voltage to use for a project depends on the requirements and specifications of the components being used. It is important to refer to the datasheet for each component to determine the recommended voltage range. Factors such as power consumption and circuit design should also be taken into consideration when choosing a voltage.

4. What are the consequences of using the wrong voltage for a circuit?

Using the wrong voltage for a circuit can lead to a variety of consequences, such as damaging electronic components, causing malfunctions or failures, and potentially creating safety hazards. It is important to always use the recommended voltage range to ensure proper and safe functioning of the circuit.

5. Are there any exceptions to using a voltage V <2.5 V?

There may be some exceptions to using a voltage V <2.5 V, depending on the specific components and circuit design. Some components may require a slightly higher or lower voltage for optimal performance. It is important to refer to the datasheet and consult with a professional engineer to determine any exceptions for a specific project.

Suggested for: Choose a voltage V <2.5 V

Back
Top