Choosing a university in Canada

In summary, a Colombian student is looking to study physics in Canada and is considering universities like SFU, University of Calgary, and McMaster. They are interested in astrophysics and quantum physics and are seeking advice and suggestions. They are also considering Queen's University, which has a strong physics program and ties to research laboratories. Another student studying physics at SFU offers their perspective and recommends taking computer science courses. They also mention that SFU may not have as many opportunities in astrophysics compared to other schools.
  • #1
Emilioc
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Hi everyone.
I am a Colombian student looking to study in Canada.
I am trying to apply for physics undergrad programs in universities like SFU, UoCalgary and mcmaster.
I am interested in astrophysics and also quantum physics
Since you know a lot I would appreciate if you give me advice and suggestions, I open for any comments.
Thanks.
 
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  • #2
Have a look at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. They have a very strong physics program for a long time. I enjoyed my time there as an undergrad. Queen's started the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (Queen's Arthur McDonald won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015). The physics dept does research there and also has strong ties to the Chalk River nuclear research laboratories which had 2 Nobel prize winners.
 
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  • #3
I am studying physics at SFU right now. If you have any questions let me know and I'll try to answer them.
 
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  • #4
bentleyghioda said:
I am studying physics at SFU right now. If you have any questions let me know and I'll try to answer them.
Thanks for the help
Are you enjoying it? I mean do you think it was a good decision to go to SFU or you think there would've been better options.
what do you think about the profs?
and do you like Vancouver?
I from the list SFU is my favorite from the list because I hear a lot of ggod things of it.
 
  • #5
Andrew Mason said:
Have a look at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. They have a very strong physics program for a long time. I enjoyed my time there as an undergrad. Queen's started the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (Queen's Arthur McDonald won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015). The physics dept does research there and also has strong ties to the Chalk River nuclear research laboratories which had 2 Nobel prize winners.
Emilioc said:
Thanks for the help
Are you enjoying it? I mean do you think it was a good decision to go to SFU or you think there would've been better options.
what do you think about the profs?
and do you like Vancouver?
I from the list SFU is my favorite from the list because I hear a lot of ggod things of it.
Also, is there anyway I can take computer science courses or related work, or you just see physics
Thanks
 
  • #6
Emilioc said:
Also, is there anyway I can take computer science courses or related work, or you just see physics
Thanks

To the OP:

In most (if not all) Canadian universities, students are free to take any elective courses beyond the required courses for any specific program. So my guess is that yes, you are able to take computer science courses (if it is not already a requirement, as it may be in some schools), and I would strongly recommend you to take them.

To your original question:

All of the universities mentioned in your original post (SFU, University of Calgary, McMaster) are great schools for physics, as is Queen's University. Among other schools worth considering include University of Toronto (my alma mater, btw), McGill University, Concordia University, UBC, University of Waterloo, and the University of Victoria.

In all honesty, there is not much difference in quality of undergrad programs for physics (or really any of the sciences) across Canadian universities, so which school to choose will depend on other factors that may be important to you. Hope this is helpful!
 
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  • #7
Emilioc said:
Thanks for the help
Are you enjoying it? I mean do you think it was a good decision to go to SFU or you think there would've been better options.
what do you think about the profs?
and do you like Vancouver?
I from the list SFU is my favorite from the list because I hear a lot of ggod things of it.

I definitely think SFU was a good choice for me. I live nearby, which has made the transition a bit easier for me. I'm just finishing my first semester so I don't have too much experience with different professors, but so far I have found all my professors to be really good. Something I really like about SFU so far is that they have lots of experiences to see what is going on in physics. They regularly have speakers talking about their research. I have been to a few of these talks; some have gone way over my head, but there were also quite a few aimed at an undergraduate audience. There is also a program that allows first year physics students to experience what it is like to be in a research group.

One thing to keep in mind is that if you are interested in going into astrophysics, SFU doesn't have too much going on. From what I understand, many schools have a separate astronomy program. SFU, though, has a first year astronomy course, a third year astrophysics course, and a fourth year course on general relativity. They also have two research groups working in cosmology. Also, every Friday they open up the observatory to the public. The university is located on a mountain, so the view is very nice. Lots of people slid bring their own telescopes, it is quite an enjoyable event.

Sorry about the wall of text, I hope this helps.
 

Related to Choosing a university in Canada

1. What are the top universities in Canada?

The top universities in Canada include the University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, McGill University, and the University of Montreal.

2. How do I determine which university is the best fit for me?

It is important to consider factors such as program offerings, location, cost, and campus culture when choosing a university. Researching and visiting different universities can help you determine which one aligns with your academic and personal goals.

3. Are there any scholarships or financial aid options for international students in Canada?

Yes, there are various scholarships and financial aid options available for international students in Canada. These include merit-based scholarships, need-based financial aid, and government-funded programs. It is important to research and apply for these opportunities early.

4. Can I work while studying at a university in Canada?

Yes, international students in Canada are allowed to work part-time while studying. However, there are restrictions and regulations in place, and it is important to check with the university and the Canadian government before seeking employment.

5. How can I apply for a student visa to study in Canada?

To apply for a student visa, you will need to have been accepted to a designated learning institution in Canada and provide proof of financial support. You will also need to pass a medical exam and provide a police certificate. The application process may vary depending on your country of origin, so it is best to check with the Canadian embassy or consulate in your home country for specific requirements.

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