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Circuit Analyses

  1. Jan 31, 2008 #1
    The questions says that it doesn't matter if the switch is open or closed.

    It asks, what is the emf E3 in terms of the other quantities shown.

    I have attached a diagram of the circuit.

    Thank you in advance.

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 31, 2008 #2
    can anyone help with this problem please...
  4. Jan 31, 2008 #3


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    We can't help because we can't see the figure yet (it has not been approved for viewing yet). Unless you have it available on some website and you provide the link or you describe it in words, we will have to wait before we can help.
  5. Feb 1, 2008 #4


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    If it doesn't matter, then E3 is just the voltage between those two points with the switch open.
  6. Feb 1, 2008 #5
    Use Kirchoff's laws to solve this problem and ask if u get stuck somewhere.

    The thing is.. in the homework forum.. we can't really help you unless you show some efforts from your side too.
  7. Feb 1, 2008 #6

    Ben Niehoff

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    What he said.

    Also, is the switch open or closed? If it's open, then your answer is very easy.
  8. Feb 1, 2008 #7
    that is impossible. You see.. switches were invented for a reason.
  9. Feb 1, 2008 #8

    Ben Niehoff

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    My guess is that the original problem statement is actually asking for E3 for either state of the switch.
  10. Feb 1, 2008 #9
    wait a minute.. since E3 is the e.m.f of the battery.. isn't it totally arbitrary and as such independent of any other variables?
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