Circular Motion of a cyclist

In summary, to round a bend in a rough and flat ground, a cyclist must tilt at an angle of 20 degrees to the vertical. The speed of the cyclist is proportional to the angle that the cyclist tilts to the vertical and the weight of the cyclist and bike.
  • #1
gunblaze
187
0
In order to round a bend of radius 20m on a rough and flat level ground. A cyclist must tilt at an angle of 20 degrees to the vertical. What is the spped of the cyclist?

Can anyone help me with this qn pls...?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
HINT:Draw a FBD and then u'll figure out that the tangential (to the trajectory) component of gravity is in fact a centripetal force.

Daniel.
 
  • #3
gunblaze said:
In order to round a bend of radius 20m on a rough and flat level ground. A cyclist must tilt at an angle of 20 degrees to the vertical. What is the spped of the cyclist?

Can anyone help me with this qn pls...?

HINT:Draw a FBD and then u'll figure out that the tangential (to the trajectory) component of gravity is in fact a centripetal force.

Daniel.

I don't think this hint says quite what it was intended to say. There is no component of gravity tangential to the trajectory. But there is a centripetal force that comes from the frictional force acting on the tires of the bike, and there is a normal force countering the weight of the cyclist and bike.

From here, there are two ways to look at the problem. One is in terms of the fictitious or apparent centrifugal force acting on the cyclist and bike in their frame of reference that is opposite the centripetal force. The sum of the weight plus the centrifugal force must act along the line of the bike inclined 20 degress from the vertical or else the bike would topple over.

Another way to look at the problem is to convince yourself that the force from the ground (friction plus normal force) must act on a line through the center of the bike. One way to do that is to look at the comparable problem of a bike on a banked frictionless track where the only forces are the normal force and the gravitational force. The bike must be perpendicular to the track or else it would slip. Gravity must act downward, and the normal force in this case must act through the center of the bike, with a vertical component equal to the weight and a horizontal component that is the centripetal force. These are equivalent to the forces that must act on a flat track with friction. The net force from the ground must act through the center of the bike.
 

1. What is circular motion?

Circular motion is the movement of an object along a circular path. It is a type of motion that involves both a change in direction and a constant speed.

2. How does a cyclist maintain circular motion?

A cyclist maintains circular motion by continuously pedaling their bicycle. This creates a force that propels the bicycle forward and keeps it moving along the circular path.

3. What forces are acting on a cyclist during circular motion?

The main forces acting on a cyclist during circular motion are centripetal force, which keeps the cyclist moving along the circular path, and friction, which provides the necessary grip for the cyclist to maintain balance.

4. What factors affect the speed of a cyclist in circular motion?

The speed of a cyclist in circular motion is affected by the radius of the circular path, the force applied by the cyclist's pedaling, and the presence of external forces such as wind resistance or changes in elevation.

5. How does circular motion impact a cyclist's balance?

Circular motion can impact a cyclist's balance if there is an imbalance in the forces acting on the bicycle. If the centripetal force is greater than the frictional force, the cyclist may lose balance and fall off the bicycle. This is why it is important for a cyclist to maintain a steady pedaling motion and pay attention to any external forces that may affect their balance.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
774
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
55
Views
629
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
31
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
668
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top