Classical Music Quizz II

honestrosewater

Gold Member
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Kenneth Mann said:
Bach lived during the later Baroque period, here we are looking for someone from the late classical period.

KM
Oh, I missed that part. I guess it won't hurt me to guess Mozart then.
Edit: Do you mean the earlier Baroque period or do I know less than I think?
 
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rachmaninoff

He means late Baroque (I think).
 
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rachmaninoff said:
No. 6 - Beethoven?
Correct!

KM
 
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zoobyshoe said:
I've never read that particular story, but both Mozart and Beethoven were good enough at improvisation to have repeated one note for note, and they both were alive during the late classical period, although Beethoven morphed things over into the Romantic era.
No disagreement on any of those. Many claim Beethoven as the impetus/inspiration for the Romantic period, however when asked, Beethoven would vehemently deny any Romantic tendencies.

KM
 
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honestrosewater said:
Oh, I missed that part. I guess it won't hurt me to guess Mozart then.
Edit: Do you mean the earlier Baroque period or do I know less than I think?
Not Mozart this time, but a good guess.

rachmaninoff said:
He means late Baroque (I think).
Regarding the lifetime of Bach, relative to the others, let's figure it out:

Bach: 1685 - 1750
Mozart 1756 - 1792
Beethoven 1770 -1826

(J. S. Bach's son Johann Christian Bach, from whom Mozart got much of his inspiration, was not a lot older than Mozart.)

Many of the Romantic composers were born during the period from 1810 to 1840.
 

honestrosewater

Gold Member
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Oh, I interpreted it as meaning the Baroque period which was later than the Classical period. I knew I shouldn't have jumped in this thread. :rolleyes:
 
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honestrosewater said:
Oh, I interpreted it as meaning the Baroque period which was later than the Classical period. I knew I shouldn't have jumped in this thread. :rolleyes:
Placing of these periods is largely subjective, however as an approximate reference the following are taken from the "Dictionary of Music" (1973) by Theodore Karp:

Baroque: 1600 - 1750
Rococo: 1710 - 1775
Classical: 1750 - 1820
Romantic 1820 - 1910

KM
 
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"Classical Music" is an infrequently challenged misnomer used to designate all the artistically more serious music penned from around medieval times to the present. The actual "Classical" period in music is just a short part of that timeline.
 
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Kenneth Mann said:
Bach: 1685 - 1750
Mozart 1756 - 1792
Beethoven 1770 -1826
Beethoven died in 1827
Mozart died in 1791

marlon
 
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#2 Ignacy Jan Paderewski:



"When Germany attacked Poland in 1939 and President I. Moscicki hastened to Romania, Paderewski was asked to succeed him, but declined because of ill health. In January 1940, he became president of the new Polish Parliament-in-Exile. In December 1940, he went to the United States and died in New York City on June 29, 1941.
Upon receiving word of Paderewski's death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt called the State Department and asked that the department inform Paderewski's family and officials of the Polish embassy that Paderewski's body could be given a temporary resting place in the vault of the Mast of the USS Maine Monument in Arlington National Cemetery. President Roosevelt said, "He may lie there until Poland is free." "

Military District of Washington - Fact Sheet: Ignacy Jan Paderewski
Address:http://www.mdw.army.mil/fs-p35.htm
 
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#5
The answer is probably Johannes Brahms and Piotr Tchaikovsky, who were both born on 7, May.
 
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zoobyshoe said:
#2 Ignacy Jan Paderewski:



"When Germany attacked Poland in 1939 and President I. Moscicki hastened to Romania, Paderewski was asked to succeed him, but declined because of ill health. In January 1940, he became president of the new Polish Parliament-in-Exile. In December 1940, he went to the United States and died in New York City on June 29, 1941.
Upon receiving word of Paderewski's death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt called the State Department and asked that the department inform Paderewski's family and officials of the Polish embassy that Paderewski's body could be given a temporary resting place in the vault of the Mast of the USS Maine Monument in Arlington National Cemetery. President Roosevelt said, "He may lie there until Poland is free." "


Military District of Washington - Fact Sheet: Ignacy Jan Paderewski
Address:http://www.mdw.army.mil/fs-p35.htm
All correct!

KM
 
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zoobyshoe said:
#5
The answer is probably Johannes Brahms and Piotr Tchaikovsky, who were both born on 7, May.
Correct!

KM
 
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marlon said:
Beethoven died in 1827
Mozart died in 1791

marlon
Sorry. That's what happens when you try to go from memory.

KM
 
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Just to put closure on this string, the remaining questions are as follows:
Composers
1. Each of these two composers usually kept a gun handy and nearby. Who were they, and what was the reason in each case?
These questions on composers were of a trivia nature, and thus a bit obscure. the two composers in mind were 1) Puccini; who had a passion for duck hunting and kept a shotgun nearby. The other, Sibelius; had a passion of a somewhat different nature: Luftwaffe.

3. This composer/performer, in his younger days, performed several works which he claimed were newly discovered compositions of the masters of previous periods. It was later found that he was the actual composer. Who was he.
Answer, Fritz Kreisler, whose works have ever since performed by almost all solo violinists (including Heifetz).

4. These two countrymen each died as result of accidents; one on a bicycle and the other (indirectly) after the debilitating effects of an automobile accident. Who were they?
First, Ernest Chausson, who riding a big-wheel bike, ran into a wall, and the other, Maurice Ravel, who was badly injured in an auto accident. He lived several years after, but died as result of an operation intended to correct the problems of the accident.

Orchestral Works
7.The composer produced this symphony, as a student at age seventeen, which was then forgotten and unpublished for almost a century. Since then, however it has become a concert favorite,and was even used in a ballet. By the way, Mozart also produced a breakout symphony at age 17, though his was not as popular as the one of our subject composer. Who was our subject composer and what symphony was it?
Answer: Georges Bizet and the work was his Symphony (Number One) in C Major. If you are not familiar with this work, I'd recommend hearing it at least once. It shows us what a seventeen year-old can do. The only other work I can think of, of similar popularity is (part of) Mendelssohn's Midsummer Night's Dream.

Opera
11. Which Operatic overture, by what composer, caused quite a stir simply because it was started with a "drum roll"?
Answer: Overture to "La Gazza Ladra" (The Thieving Magpie), by Gioacchino Rossini.

13. A scene in what opera, by which composer, is described as taking place on a desolate plain outside New Orleans? (Huh! I didn't know there was a desolate plain anywhere near New Orleans?)
Only this one Operatic question was apparently obscure. Answer: "Manon Lescaut" (Act 4), by Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini.

15. A certain well-known Operatic singer, according to a protege and successor, was described as functionally, nearly blind, and to avoid embarrassing accidents during a performance, would pace off all distances on-stage before a performance. Who was this person?
This last question was another trivia type. According to Joan Sutherland, the person in question was Maria Callas.

KM
 

Gokul43201

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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Great quiz, KM. Much appreciated. :approve:
 

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