Classical spin of an electron?

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  • #27
epenguin
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I dont believe that the electron really spins but why would it radiate? the field isnt changing.
The energies of the two states of the electron are different in a magnetic field. Isn't the absorption then of radiation in transition between them electron spin resonance? It is routinely measured in atoms or molecules with unpaired electrons.

The difference of the two energy states accounts for fine splitting in the hydrogen spectrum. (However I do not remember hearing of an absorbance/emission corresponding to a direct transition between them in atomic hydrogen, but maybe someone will clarify this and any other mistake above :shy:).
 
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  • #28
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Spin = magnetic moment

(We can directly measure only the spin magnetic moment,
can not directly measure the spin angular momentum and spin g-factor.)

Spin angular momentum 1/2 is the origin of all strange problems.

* spin magnetic moment = spin g-factor X spin angular momentum ....

If we suppose spin angular momentum is 1 (not 1/2), spin g-factor becomes 1 (not 2).
1 X 1 = 1/2 X 2 , So observed magnetic moment is not changed.

If spin g-factor is 1, the charge and mass of one electron need not to be separated.
And if spin angular momentum is 1, The spinning electron will return to their original configuration when it is rotated by an angle of 2π. (like usual angular momentum eigenfunctions)

All above strange problems will be solved ! (But this is just an assumtion.)
 
  • #29
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I assumed that the ratio of spin magnetic moment to spin angular momentum (the gyromagnetic ratio ge) was measured directly in nuclear magnetic resonance.

I still find it surprising that a magnet placed in a magnetic field will resonate.
 
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could the 'effective mass' of the spinning electron be half of its real mass? presumably it would have to rotate twice as fast to conserve angular momentum. could that explain why the gyromagnetic ratio is 2? does the effective mass play any role in the structure of the atom?

now it seems that even whole solids can have an 'effective mass'.
http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=10389.php
Although the theory that frozen helium might be a supersolid has been around for years, the first evidence that it was at least a super-something was provided in a 2004 experiment by Moses Chan at Penn State. Researchers there placed a tiny cylinder of frozen helium in a torsion oscillator, which rotates rapidly forward and back, like a washing machine agitator. The resonant frequency of the oscillator -- the one it naturally settles into -- depends on the mass it's trying to move around and back. The researchers found that below a critical temperature, some of the mass of the (solid) helium seemed to disappear.
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/27794
Physicists in the US have shown that a supposed quantum phase of matter known as a "supersolid" is strongly dependent on the amount of crystal disorder present in the sample being studied. By performing experiments on samples of helium-4 with large amounts of disorder, they found that the trademark effects of supersolidity in the samples rose to more than 20% -- by far the largest proportion seen so far.
 
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