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Clean and fix up

  1. Apr 14, 2008 #1

    wolram

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    I have 2 weeks holiday and it is all allocated to house cleaning and fixing, i have a list as long as my leg, heck knows where to start first outside work or inside, there is a mountain of rubble to clear outside and a 1/4 inch of dust inside, may be i should hope for a strong wind and open the windows, is there such a thing as a house cleaning party? i could buy some booze.
    I just moved a rug and i can see the original carpet colour, there is sand on the window sills,
    how the heck did that get there ,and i think all the curtains need cleaning, this is going to be like 2 weeks in hell.
     
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  3. Apr 14, 2008 #2
  4. Apr 15, 2008 #3

    lisab

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    My house gets dusty quickly, too. Every now and then, when I can't keep up, I hire house cleaners. At first I thought it would feel strange having other people clean my house, but know what? I got over it!!

    Get some hired help, Woolie. It's worth it - keep your time off to yourself!
     
  5. Apr 15, 2008 #4

    wolram

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    What a great idea, i can do the tidy up outside and leave the difficult stuff to some agency,
    i would never of thought of that, i will get an look through yellow pages.

    lisab my new hero.
     
  6. Apr 15, 2008 #5

    turbo

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    Very good advice, lisab! I have a friend who owns a cleaning service and has several women working for her. They arrive equipped for about any clean-up problem, and they are fast and thorough. They clean lots of offices after-hours, including the medical practice I once worked for, and they often clean private homes during the day.
     
  7. Apr 15, 2008 #6

    wolram

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    May be when my house is pristine i can get a work plan organised, it just knowing when the jobs need doing, i mean things get dirty gradually and one does not notice, so on average how often would one,

    Clean a carpet
    wash curtains
    clean upholstery
    Polish wood, like skirting boards, dido rails.

    Dido rails are stupid as you have wall paper top and bottom of them and any grime will likely transfer to said wall paper when one polishes them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2008
  8. Apr 15, 2008 #7
    I was able to open windows today for the first time, and with real sunligh pouring, I see the dust!!!! Maybe I should just close the windows?
     
  9. Apr 15, 2008 #8
    Do you mean on average how often do I? would I? or should I?
    do I: once every 6 months
    would I: once a month is my plan
    should I: once every two weeks
     
  10. Apr 15, 2008 #9

    wolram

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    Once every 2 weeks, my plan is all ready out the window, once a month sounds ok.
     
  11. Apr 15, 2008 #10

    Moonbear

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    Depends a bit on how much traffic it gets. If you're someone who takes your shoes off every time you walk in the door and don't have too many others walking on it and no pets shedding fur all over it, then vacuuming once every 2 weeks or once a month even is usually enough...more often in areas that get dirty quickly, like near kitchens where things fall on the floor as you cook. And you could get it actually cleaned (as in shampooing or steam cleaning the carpet) once every year or two. If you have people constantly walking through with muddy feet, then it could be daily or weekly vacuuming and getting it cleaned every 6 months).

    I don't. Mine aren't very washable. If they start looking dingy, I get new ones (I don't have expensive drapes though, so it would probably cost more to take them to a cleaner than to replace them, which is why this works best for me).

    Again, it depends on how hard you are on it. I very rarely clean upholstery (mostly if I spill something on it), but I also don't sit on it if I come home filthy from work. Some people do and it will get dirty sooner. The same people who steam clean carpets can usually clean things like sofas, so other than spot cleaning, you can have it done at the same time if it needs it.

    I just vacuum along those when I vacuum the floors to pick up dust and cat hair (I assume by skirting boards you mean the boards down at the bottom of the wall that hides the edges of the carpet/flooring).

    I think what you're calling dido rails is what we call chair rails here (about at the height of a back of a chair so it protects the wall from chairs pushed back?) Once every month or two I do a really thorough dusting of the house from top to bottom, and that's when I do those. I just use the brush attachment on the vacuum hose (the one meant for upholstery), and use it to sweep up the dust from the nooks and crannies while the vacuum sucks up the dust...keeps it from settling right back onto stuff. I use that for dusting shelves and fireplace mantles and anything else that needs dusting too. Much easier than getting out polishing cloths if you don't need to actually polish the surfaces (I only end up polishing things like coffee tables and end tables that tend to get more dirty from stuff being put down on them).
     
  12. Apr 15, 2008 #11

    turbo

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    Woolie, you can do some REALLY fast effective dusting if you will locate some cleaning cloths made from micro-fiber. There's no point in cleaning and polishing chair rails when you can swipe them with a dry micro-fiber cloth and pick up every bit of dust. When you're done, throw the cloth in the laundry and it'll be ready to go again. They are wonderful for cleaning PC monitors.

    Another tip: The most versatile solution for cleaning windows, mirrors, stove-tops, counter-tops etc is a 50:50 mix of Isopropyl alcohol and water. Fill a spray bottle with that and clean away! It's cheap and effective and it doesn't leave residue or streaks. Stuff that is not too soluble in water often yields to alcohol, so this is a really effective solution.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2008
  13. Apr 15, 2008 #12

    wolram

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    Some good thinking going on here,
    Buy cheapish curtains
    vacuum dido/ chair rails, only my vacuum is an upright one and has only a short hose at the side, i will change that as it it will not go under furniture, i will buy a cylinder type.
    And i have to replace carpet with burn holes any way, so i will get a rugged short pile one.
     
  14. Apr 15, 2008 #13
    Just to see if it would work, one time, I propped all the doors open, took off the screens, waited until the breeze was strong and steady, and......



    turned on the leaf blower to see if it would get rid of some of the dust in those places I couldn't see .....


    it worked better than I expected.....
     
  15. Apr 15, 2008 #14

    Moonbear

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    *cough* *cough* *cough* You should warn someone before you start up that thing indoors! :biggrin:
     
  16. Apr 15, 2008 #15

    wolram

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    This is just giving me ideas and is cruel, i can just imagine every thing that is not bolted down disappearing out the back door.
     
  17. Apr 15, 2008 #16
    I got the idea from that old wives/maids/womans saying about blowing out the cobwebs


    I remember reading someplace that something like 97% of the dust settles on 'top' surfaces (floor, and on top of the 'things')---that still left the other 3% on the underside of things, the walls, the ceiling, etc. that doesn't usually get 'dusted'--3% is a lot after a while if compared to, and when you compare to the amount of the dust on things and what the vacuum gets.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2008
  18. Apr 15, 2008 #17

    wolram

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    I will see if can find some, never heard of them though, isopropyl alcohol where would one buy that?
     
  19. Apr 15, 2008 #18

    wolram

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    Well we do have some killowatt fans with 2ft blades going spare at work, we use them to cool staff down in the summer, but health and safety stoped there use, they can be ramped up to blow a gale.
     
  20. Apr 15, 2008 #19

    turbo

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    Isopropyl alcohol is commonly sold as "rubbing alcohol" - pop down to your local chemist. It's really cheap in larger bottles, and if you have discount chains like Wal-Mart over there, it will be even cheaper. You'll probably find it stocked near bandages, etc, near the hydrogen peroxide.
     
  21. Apr 15, 2008 #20
    Those two blades fans would be good blowing the dust 'out' at the door---the leaf blower was good because I could direct its high, narrowed force at specific things --in and around tables, curtains, chairs, etc.---

    The very best thing I found for glass (I have a whole bunch of framed antique prints, etchings, engravings, watercolors, woodblocks, early photographs, etc.) is that Amyway Zoom. It leaves absolutely no streaks.
     
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