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Cleaning Micro-fribre Cloth

  1. Aug 11, 2009 #1

    Danger

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    Didn't we used to have a 'General Technology' sub-forum? :confused:
    Anyhow, I'm posting this here because I don't think that it quite fits into 'Materials Engineering'.
    W gave me a really neat little micro-fibre cloth about 3 years ago, for cleaning my glasses. I also got one with my MacBook to clean the screen.
    Anyhow, this thing has been kicking around in my pants pocket ever since I got it. It looks like the oil rag that you'd find in a mechanics' coveralls, yet it still cleans like crazy.
    My question is, how you I clean it. The packaging said that it should never get wet.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2009 #2
    Your micro-fibre cloth says not to get it wet? I soak mine with warm water before using it to clean a load of things, like my ceramic top stove. Anyhow, to clean it, my packaging says (and I have done/do) throw it in the regular wash and hang it to dry. If you happen to wreck it, go to a Dollar Store and buy more.
     
  4. Aug 11, 2009 #3
    I wash mine in cold water with powdered detergent, NO fabric softener, then air-dry.
     
  5. Aug 11, 2009 #4
    I got a couple of them with my last glasses and the optician said that they can be cleaned in the washing machine. I've been doing that with no ill effects. It really is a nice material, but it does retain all the stuff that goes onto it, so you have to clean it sometimes. I know when it needs it when I start to see a bit of smearing on the lenses, showing that it's redepositing the oils and stuff.

    Has anyone used these things for larger projects like windows?
     
  6. Aug 11, 2009 #5
    Oh yes! When I first purchased mine I wiped down and cleaned the entire dashboard of my car while the cloth was still dry. (A young workmate I'd loaned my Jeep to commented on the 5 cm of dust that was on my dash and made me feel guilty so that was the inspiration to stop and pick up one of the things in the first place.) And it did a remarkable job. Then I noticed that the interior of my windshield had a thin haze on it, so I wiped the entirety of that too. It was remarkable. The glass on my windshield was almost invisible. I don't think I've ever tried a highly-touted "miracle" type product before and have been that completely impressed with the stupid thing.
     
  7. Aug 11, 2009 #6

    Danger

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    By strange coincidence, W works at the local Dollar Store. :biggrin:
    Thanks to all for the input. Once she teaches me how to use my washing machine, which she bloody well better before she moves away, I'll give it a try.
     
  8. Aug 11, 2009 #7
    I wonder if what they meant is not to use is wet.

    I don't think they rely on chemicals or anything that may get washed away. I believe it's just the structure of the material.
     
  9. Aug 11, 2009 #8

    Danger

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    That sounds quite reasonable. It is indeed the fibre structure that provides the cleaning action. I was worried that maybe washing it would alter that structure. Apparently, from the responses, that is not the case. I might have misread the original instructions.
     
  10. Aug 12, 2009 #9
    It is just the structure of the material, but I use it both wet and dry depending on what I'm doing. For dusting or for glass or my computer monitor, yes, I use it dry. I have a ceramic top stove that is a pain in the backside to clean -- and not just the stovetop surface but the glass-faced back with all of the buttons and knobs. Especially trying to get grease off. Previously I used a combination water and vinegar with a soft cloth and then hot water and dish soap with a soft cloth. Then dry, then repeat. With this stupid new cloth-mabob I wet it with warm water and wiped the whole shebang down and it came up spotless and beautifully shiny. It's goofily wild how good the microfibre thing is.

    Edited to add: also, this past weekend while on an extended telephone conversation, I wet the thing in warm water and cleaned years of guck off of my keyboard keys. The keyboard looks new.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2009
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