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Climber's total energy

  1. Mar 8, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Og3ykop.png

    2. Relevant equations
    ΔU = Uf - Ui
    ΔW=-ΔU
    3. The attempt at a solution
    I am unsure if the question combines both climbers' masses or they each have a mass of 75 kg + the 20 kg they are holding. In a), are they asking for the total work of each climber? Or just the gravitational potential energy? For b), do you also just find the gravitational PE at each camp stop?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 8, 2016 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    I would assume each has a mass of 75 kg. The problem asks about how much energy (work) they each must do for the ascent (part a) or portions of the ascent (part b). What do you mean by total work as opposed to work done against gravity?
     
  4. Mar 8, 2016 #3
    So for part a), are you calculating gravitational PE for each climber?
     
  5. Mar 9, 2016 #4

    PhanthomJay

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    Yes, the change in PE from beginning to end. What does that change represent?
     
  6. Mar 9, 2016 #5
    How much energy they must spend in order to climb correctly.
     
  7. Mar 9, 2016 #6

    PhanthomJay

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    Ok
     
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