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Coefficient friction

  1. Nov 8, 2005 #1
    if you are given the coefficient of friction, initial velocity, and asked for the distance traveled, how would you do it? my first instinct is to use the vf^2=vi^2+2a(xf-xi), but i don't think that coefficient of friction is hanging out there for no reason?
     
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  3. Nov 8, 2005 #2

    Tide

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    You're right - it's not hanging out there for no reason!

    What, exactly, is the quantity a you wrote in your equation?
     
  4. Nov 8, 2005 #3
    i was assuming a=9.8, but i guess that was bad physics.
    i'm tempted to relate this to f=ma, but there's no mass!

    man, the last chapter has twice as many equations as the previous chapters combined. :(
     
  5. Nov 8, 2005 #4

    Tide

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    Presumably, somewhere in that chapter, there was discussion of the force of friction. Does this ring a bell? [itex]F_f = \mu F_n[/itex], i.e. the frictional force is proportional to the normal force. Can you guess what the proportionality constant is? :)
     
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