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Coefficient of expansion

  1. May 4, 2006 #1
    I just have a quick question. In my assignment the coefficient of expansion for mercury is listed in K, and the temperatures given are listed in degress C.

    Online I've seen the exact same coefficient of expansion (1.8 x 10-4) but in Celsius.

    Can the coefficient be in either units, and therefore do I need to change the units of my temperature to get the correct answer?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2006 #2

    Hootenanny

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    No you don't need to convert between the two, one degree kelvin is of the same magnitude as one degree celcius. In otherwords if the temperature is increased by 1 degree celcius it is also increased by one degree kelvin.

    ~H
     
  4. May 4, 2006 #3
    thanks that makes sense
     
  5. May 4, 2006 #4

    Kurdt

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    Kelvin and celsius a scales use the same divisions but different zero starting points thus the coefficient of expansion is exactly the same in either units as there is a 1:1 relationship.

    Edit: Too late
     
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