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Coefficient of Friction Lab

  1. Dec 6, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    given: a large block ramp, a smaller block (one side wood, other side felt), and a stopwatch
    refer to this picture:
    http://01.edu-cdn.com/files/static/w...SLIDING_01.GIF [Broken]

    you don't know weight, or θ but I do have the measurements for the x and y axis

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    I did five trials each for the wood on wood side and the felt on wood side. I measured the x and the y-axis along with the time it took for the object to slide all the way across the large ramp.

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    find coefficient of friction, static and kinetic

    2. Relevant equations
    Fnet=ma
    vf=vi+at



    3. The attempt at a solution

    What I have so far:
    Procedure:
    1. Measure the large block ramp
    2. Increase theta until the block starts moving and stop. During this process, use a stop watch to measure how long the small block takes to travel the ramp.
    3. Repeat this process for both the wooden on wood and felt on wood.
    Explanation and justification:
    By measuring the large block, you get the distance the smaller block will travel, whether it’s wood on wood or felt on wood. The stop watch measures how long it takes. With this information, we can get acceleration, which would then lead us to calculate the coefficient of friction.

    For kinetic friction, I think it's something like this:
    Fnet=ma
    -k=ma
    ukFf=ma

    Not sure on rest...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 6, 2011 #2

    Delphi51

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    Homework Helper

    This gets quite complex when you have a ramp at an angle. The angle effects how the force of gravity is resolved into a normal force causing friction and a force along the ramp causing acceleration. You might start by studying the explanation in your text book or something like this: http://library.thinkquest.org/16600/intermediate/force.shtml
     
  4. Dec 6, 2011 #3
    What would be the proper steps to solve for both the static and kinetic friction though? I took measurements of the x and y lengths of every trial.
     
  5. Dec 6, 2011 #4

    Delphi51

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    Homework Helper

    I have no way of knowing what x and y are. Your diagram does not display; perhaps it is only accessible to students enrolled. Perhaps you could copy it and put it up on photobucket for us.
     
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