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Coefficient of Friction

  1. Nov 15, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A 50.2 kg object begins to slide down a 32 degree ramp. What is the coefficient of friction for this ramp? What is the objects acceleration down the ramp? If the object is 2.51m from the bottom of the ramp, what will be its final velocity? How long does it take for the object to slide down the ramp?


    2. Relevant equations
    What are the steps and formulas to get to the answers?
    I know sin cos and tan theorums.


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 15, 2009 #2

    ideasrule

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    Try looking up Newton's second law as well as some of the kinematics equations.
    However, the question doesn't make sense. It's impossible to figure out the coefficient of friction with the information given. Without the coefficient, answering the rest of the questions is impossible. Are you sure you copied the question correctly?
     
  4. Nov 15, 2009 #3
    Yes, I'm sure. Im pretty sure that the downward force is 261N. This is because the sin(32) multiplied by the force of gravity 9.80m/s squared is such. Does that help?
     
  5. Nov 15, 2009 #4

    ideasrule

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    That's the force along the ramp, yes. However, without the coefficient of friction, you can't do anything. If the friction is barely measurable, that's obviously going to give you a different answer than if the friction was almost as strong as gravity.
     
  6. Nov 15, 2009 #5
    Okay. What other things would i need to find the coefficient of friction? I might have something. Thanks alot!
     
  7. Nov 15, 2009 #6

    ideasrule

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    If you know the acceleration of the object, you can deduce from that the coefficient of friction.

    Can you post the problem word for word? Don't leave out anything, even if you think it's not important.
     
  8. Nov 15, 2009 #7
    Sadly, that is the problem word for word. My physics teacher just wrote the problem on the board for homework.
     
  9. Nov 15, 2009 #8

    ideasrule

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    That makes the problem unsolvable, then. You can safely move on (and perhaps tell the teacher about the missing info).
     
  10. Nov 15, 2009 #9
    Alright. You said I could deduce to find the coefficient of friction. How would i do so?
     
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