Coefficient of Kinetic Friction

In summary, the conversation is discussing a lab report involving a hockey puck on a ramp, where displacement, acceleration, and time are measured. The person is seeking help with the discussion questions, specifically assessing the assumption of constant acceleration, discussing the effect of mass on friction coefficients, and analyzing sources of error in the lab. The expert provides a brief summary of potential answers to the questions.
  • #1
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I am working on a lab report in which a hockey puck is put on a ramp which is lifted until the puck slides. Displacement, acceleration and time are measured. Can someone help me with the discussion questions? I wanted to be as indepth as possible with my answers, thanks in advance.

1) Assess the assumption that acceleration was constant as the object moved down the ramp in the kinetic friction section.

2) Should mass affect the static and kinetic friction coefficients? Explain.

3) Analyze sources of error (controllable and uncontrollable) in this lab.

(A good response is Urgently Required.)
 
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  • #2
1) Find the forces on the puck. Are they constant? If not, what's changing?

2) Mass doesn't affect friction coefficients, the gravity and friction both operate on mass and therefore it cancels. Heavier mass gets pulled down more by gravity, but also gets slowed down more by friction.

3) You should know htis better than I. I don't know your setup but I would imagine you used some photo sensors for timing, you could mention something about air resistance.
 
  • #3


1) The assumption that acceleration was constant as the object moved down the ramp in the kinetic friction section may not be entirely accurate. While it is true that the acceleration should be relatively constant due to the force of gravity acting on the object, there are other factors that could have affected this, such as air resistance or imperfections in the ramp surface. Additionally, as the object gains speed and moves further down the ramp, the force of kinetic friction may also increase, resulting in a slight decrease in acceleration. Therefore, while the assumption of constant acceleration may be a good approximation, it may not be entirely accurate.

2) Yes, mass can affect the static and kinetic friction coefficients. The coefficient of static friction is dependent on the normal force, which is affected by the mass of the object. A heavier object would have a greater normal force, resulting in a higher coefficient of static friction. Similarly, the coefficient of kinetic friction is also affected by the mass of the object. A heavier object would require more force to overcome the force of kinetic friction and maintain a constant velocity, resulting in a higher coefficient of kinetic friction. This relationship can be seen in the formula for friction force, where the coefficient of friction is multiplied by the normal force.

3) There are several sources of error that could have affected the results of this lab. Controllable errors could include human error, such as inaccuracies in measuring the displacement or time, or inconsistencies in applying the force to the puck. The angle of the ramp could also have been a source of error, as it may not have been perfectly consistent throughout the experiment. Uncontrollable errors could include external factors, such as air resistance or slight variations in the surface of the ramp, which could have affected the movement of the puck. Additionally, the puck itself may have had imperfections or inconsistencies that could have affected its movement. To minimize these errors, it is important to repeat the experiment multiple times and take an average of the results. Using more precise measuring tools and ensuring the ramp is properly set up can also help reduce errors.
 

What is the coefficient of kinetic friction?

The coefficient of kinetic friction is a measure of the amount of friction between two surfaces in contact when one is in motion.

How is the coefficient of kinetic friction calculated?

The coefficient of kinetic friction is calculated by dividing the force of kinetic friction by the normal force acting on an object.

What factors affect the coefficient of kinetic friction?

The coefficient of kinetic friction is affected by the type of surfaces in contact, their roughness, and the force pressing them together.

Why is the coefficient of kinetic friction important?

The coefficient of kinetic friction is important because it helps determine the amount of force needed to keep an object in motion and the rate at which it will slow down.

How does the coefficient of kinetic friction differ from the coefficient of static friction?

The coefficient of static friction refers to the amount of force needed to start an object in motion, while the coefficient of kinetic friction refers to the amount of force needed to keep an object in motion. The coefficient of kinetic friction is typically lower than the coefficient of static friction.

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